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Full text of "The neume"

E. L. Grimes Co., Printers, 122 Pearl St. : Boston 



THE NEUME 



VOLUME IX 



o 



o 



i 



i 




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o 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE CLASS OF NINETEEN 
HUNDRED AND THIRTEEN 



O 



( (O E ) ( m r ) o ( mr ) t «ni ) 




MARY ALDEN THAYER 



fEo 

Jlarp Albeit ®f)aper 

toljose grariou* anb gentle presence anb tofjose frtenblp 
interest tn all of us f)as long mabe tfje Htbrarp 
an tbeal place for stubp, recreation anb 
rest, tfjis bolume is respectfully 
bebtcateb 




CARL BAERMANN 



3n iHemortam 



Carl paermann teas trulp a musician "bp 
tfje grace of <§ob." Qttyt purttp anb beautt= 
ful Stmpltntp of fjts life, tfje breabrt) anb beptf) 
of titfii experience anb unberstanbtng gabe fjtm 
tfjat clear tnstgfjt into tfje neebs of others 
tobtcb mabe fjim tfje tbeal tearfjer* ||ts tofjole 
life toas a trtumpb of mspireb mastterlp mu= 
gtctanstfnp anb a realisation of tfje tbeal in art. 



ZEfje Class of 1913 
extenbs to 

(Seorge W. Cfmbtotcfe 

0uv 2|onoreo director 
its ftearttest greetings 




EBEN D. JORDAN 



FREDERICK L. TROWBRIDGE 



Greetings 



I am very glad to have this opportunity to send my greetings and 
very best wishes to all the students at the New England Conservatory. 
The best thing that I can possibly wish you all is, I think, an Infinite 
Capacity for Hard Work, for that is the only sure path to success. 

Olive Fremstad. 

My warmest greetings to the class of 19 13, and my best wishes to 
them. I did not say "best wishes for success," although, of course, I 
mean that, too ; but first, best wishes for good courage, and a real love 
for whatever they mean to do in life (I do not call it "work"), and 
above all, a contented heart. 

1 would like to add a special word of greeting to your Director, a 
dear friend of mind, who made my first tottering steps in music very 
happy ones. 

Louise Homer. 

m 

Hearty greetings to the New England Conservatory of Music. May 
their efforts bring about what American music lovers have been wishing 
for many years, — the establishment on solid and highly artistic basis 
of the truly American Grand Opera. 

Johanna Gadski. 



^oaro of €ottorsi 



Editor-in-Chief 
Guv S. Maier 

Business Manager 
Claire G. Oakes 

Associate Editor 
Sara Helen Littlejohn 

Assistant Editors 



Lou Adolph 
Hazel Barbiers 



Mima Montgomery 
Ella Nord 
Clara Whipple 
Alice Whitehouse 



Helex Fair 



Howard Godixg 



Assistant Business Manager 
Elizabeth Wood 



jUanagement 



Ralph L. Flanders 
Frederick L. Trowbridge 
Elizabeth C. Allen 



Manager 
Assistant Manager 
Corresponding Secretary 



Ossian E. Mills 
Martha Perkins 
Mary Alden Thayer 
Henry W. Driscoll 
Grace L. Gardner 



Business Departments 

Bursar 
Registrar 
Librarian 

Superintendent of Music Store 
Superintendent of Organs and Pianofortes 



Preceptresses 

Adeline C. Ferguson Margaret W. Avery 

a [ abel Commodore 

School Physicians 

Dr. Benjamin E. Sibley 
School Physician, 1595 Beacon Street, BrookJine 

Dr. John J. Hurley 
Throat Specialist, }fi>2 Commonwealth Ave., Boston 



Stmtorg (Commute* 



Eben D. Jordan 
Ralph L. Flanders 



George W. Chadwick 
Wallace Goodrich 



iExeruthi* (Commute* of th,t Stoaro of (UruBUrs 



Eben D. Jordan 
Arthur F. Estabrook, Frank \\ 
George W. Chadwick 
William A. L. Bazeley 
Ralph L. Flanders 
Frederick S. Conyerse 
Frederick P. Fish 



ood 



President 
Vice-Presidents 
Director 
Treasurer 
Manager 
Samuel Carr 
Edward S. Dodge 



1 8 



TL$t fltwmt 



1913 



George W. Chadwick — Director, Coun- 
terpoint and Composition. 
Born in Lowell. Mass. Studied at 
the Xew England Conservatory; at 
Leipsic under Reinecke and Jadas- 
sohn; at the Royal School of Music 
under Rheinberger and Abel. Teach- 
er at the Conservatory since 1880; 
director since 1897. Composer of 
international reputation. 



Wallace Goodrich — Organ. 

Born in Xewton, Mass. Studied at 
the Xew England Conservatory under 
Henry M. Dunham, George W. Chad- 
wick, with Rheinberger in Munich 
and Widor in Paris. Well known 
organist and conductor. Has held 
many prominent positions in Boston 
during recent years. Dean of Con- 
servatory Faculty. 



Josef Adamowski — Violencello and 
Ensemble Classes. 
Born in Warsaw, Poland. Studied at 
Warsaw Conservatory and at the Im- 
perial Conservatory, Moscow, under 
Fitzenhagen, X. Rubenstein and P. 
Tschaikowsky. Degree of B. A. 
Joined Faculty in 1902. 




ZLtit fleumc 



19 



Tl.MOTHEE ADAMOWSKI Vtolifl. 

Born in Warsaw, Poland. Studied in 
Warsaw Conservatory under Kontski, 
and in Paris under Massart. Second 
concert master of Boston Symphony 
Orchestra until 1907. Well known 
conductor. Joined Faculty in 1907. 




Estelle T. Andrews — Pianoforte. 

Born in Baltimore, Md. Graduate of 
Peabody Conservatory of Music, Bal- 
timore. Pupil of Carl Faelten and 
Helen Hopekirk, Boston. 



George Bemis — Guitar and Mandolin. 
Born in Boston. Studied with his 
father. Teacher at the New England 
Conservatory for the past twenty 
years. 



2Q 



i->eume 



1913 




Charles A. Bennett — Voice. 

Born in Bennington, Vt. Pupil of 
Charles Adams in voice, and G. W. 
Chadwick in composition. Studied 
in Paris with Trabadelo. Spent seven 
years of study in London, after which 
he made a two years' concert tour 
around the world. Joined Faculty in 
1910. 



Ramon Blanchart — Regisseuv 0] 
Grand Opera School. 
Born in Barcelona, Spain. First 
appeared in Grand Opera at the age 
of eighteen. Decorated with honors 
by the kings of Spain and Portugal 
and the Czar of Russia. Member of 
Boston Opera Company. Joined Fac- 
ultv in 1911. 





David P. Blanpied — Pianoforte. 

Graduate of the New England Con- 
servatory and of the music depart- 
ment of Boston University, receiving 
the degree of Mus. Bac. Studied 
with J. C. D. Parker, S. A. Emery, 
George E. Whiting; composition with 
William Apthorp and John K. Paine. 



19*3 



13* u me 



21 



Dr. E. Charlton Black — Lecturer on 
English and American Literature. 
Born in Liddlesdale Parish, Scotland, 
near the Old Manse of Sir Walter 
Scott. Graduated from Edinburgh 
University in the same class with J. 
M. Barrie; received LL.D. from Glas- 
gow University; now Professor of 
English in Boston University. 





Mabel Stanaway Briggs — Voice. 

Born in California. Graduated from 
the New England Conservatory in 
1898. Pupil of Augusto Rotoli, 
Charles White and Oreste Bimboni. 
Studied with Dubulle in Paris. 




22 



1913 




Samuel \Y. Cole — Solfeggio and Pub- 
lic School Music. 

Born in Meriden, X. H. Studied at 
the New England Conservatory and 
under S. B. Whitney and John X. 
Tufts. Director of music in public 
schools of Brookline since 1884. 
Author of musical text books. 



Arxoldo Coxti — Conductor of the 
Opera School. 
Member of Faculty since 1911. 



Floyd B. Dean — Pianoforte. 

Born in Richville, X. Y. Pupil of 
Adrien Sabourin. Graduate of the 
New England Conservatory. 




TL$t fftemnt 



23 



Lucy Dean — Pianoforte. 

Born in Illinois. Graduated from 
New England Conservtory in 1891. 
Studied with Dr. Mason, Mrs. Maas 
and Carl Faelton of Boston; Lesche- 
tizky in Vienna, and Buonamici in 
Florence. 





Charles Dexne e — P ia nofortc 

Born in Oswego, N. Y. Studied piano 
with A. D. Turner and Madame 
Schiller. Special study of Beethoven 
with Von Biilow during his last trip 
to America; composition with 
Stephen A. Emery. Teacher at the 
Conservatory since 1883. 



Alfred De Voto — Pianoforte. 

Born in Boston. Graduated from 
the New England Conservatory 
under Charles Dennee. Member of 
the Municipal Music Commission of 
Boston since 1898. Pianist of Longy 
Club of Boston. 




24 



TL$t fttumt 



1913 




William H. Dunham — Voice. 

Born in Brockton, Mass. Pupil of 
Augusto Rotoli and Dr. Guilmette of 
Boston; Shakespeare of London, 
Vannuccini of Florence; Koenig and 
Sbriglia of Paris; Cotogni of Rome; 
Benevenuti of Milan. 



Louis C. Elsox — Theory. 

Born in Boston, Mass. Studied piano 
with August Hamanu of Boston; 
voice with August Kreessman; com- 
position with Carl Claggner-Castelli 
of Leipsic. Celebrated lecturer and 
writer on musical subjects; one of 
Boston's best known critics. 





K u rt F 1 sc h er — P ian ofo rte . 

Graduate of the Leipsic Conservatory 
of Music. Studied with Carl Reinecke 
and Jadassohn; later joined the Fac- 
ulty of the Royal Conservatory at 
Sondershauson as a teacher of piano, 
harmony and composition; made 
several concert trips through Ger- 
many. Member of the Faculty since 
1910. 



W^t fltumt 



25 



Oliver C. Faust. 

Head of Tuning Department of New 
England Conservatory. 




Jane M. Fortier — Pianoforte. 

Born in Prance. Graduated from the 
New England Conservatory in 1898. 
Member of Faculty since 1907. 



Wallace George — J^oice. 

Born in Cambridge, Canada. Studied 
with Charles Adams, Augusto Rotoli 
and William Whitney. Concertized 
for two years. Director of Fargo 
Conservatory six years. Member of 
Faculty since 1911. 




26 



l 9 l 3 




Clayton D. Gilbert — Dramatic Action, 
Stage Deportment and Pantomime. 
Born in Wisconsin. On the stage 
with several companies. Studied 
concert deportment under Miller and 
Adams, Chicago; Instructor of acting 
and pantomime at Emerson College 
of Oratory. Joined the Faculty in 
1904. 



Henry Goodrich — Pianoforte. 

Born in Haverhill, Mass. Studied 
with Edward MacDowell in Boston, 
1889 to 1896. Member of the Faculty 
since 1908. 





Eugene Gruenberg — Violin and Viola. 
Born at Lemberg, Gallicia. Studied 
violin at Vienna Conservatory with 
Hessler; composition with Hessler 
and Dessoff; chamber music with 
Hellmesberger. Head of Violin Nor- 
mal Department. 



1913 



Wyt fttumt 



27 



Vaughn H a m elton — -I 'iolin. 

Born in Bangor, Me. Studied under 
Felix Wenternitz and Anton Witek; 
in Paris with Berthelier of the Con- 
servatory; Concertmeister of the 
New England Conservatory Orches- 
tra. 




Homer Humphrey — Organ and Har- 

mony. 

Bern at Yarmouth. Graduated from 
the New England Conservatory of 
Music in 1901-1902. Organ with Wal- 
lace Goodrich; composition with G, 
W. Chadwick. 



Percy Hunt — Voice. 

Born in Foxboro, Mass. Graduated 
from the New England Conservatory 
under William H. Dunham. Studied 
with Vannuccini in Florence and 
Bouhy in Paris. 




28 



1913 



J. Albert Jefferv — Pianoforte. 

Born in England; studied at Leipsic 
Conservatory under Reinecke, Rich- 
ter and Judassohn; studied in Paris 
with Praeger; organ and choir work 
in London. 



Clayton Joh n s — Pianoforte . 

Born in New Castle, Del. Studied 
at Harvard 1879-81 and music at Ber- 
lin until 1884; composer and writer; 
member of the Faculty since 1912. 





Leroy S. Kenfield — Trombone. 

Born in Belchertown, Ma^s. Mem- 
ber of Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



19*3 



fltumc 



2iJ 



Louis Kloepfel — Trumpet and Comet. 
Born in Thuringea. Member of Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 





Max O. Kunze — Contrabass. 

Born in Dresden. Graduate of the 
Royal Conservatory of Music. Mem- 
ber of Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



Edwin Klahre — Pianoforte. 

Born in New Jersey. Studied under 
O. Klahre, Liszt, Lebert and Joseffy, 
composition with Schulze in Weimar. 
Bruchner and Goetchins in Stuttgart. 





30 



1913 




Clement Lenom — Solfeggio and Oboe. 
Born in Gilly, Belgium. First prize 
in oboe and superior solfeggio, Brus- 
sels Conservatory. Studied with 
Massenet. Conducted orchestra at 
Geneva, Rouen, Aix les Bains. Mem 
ber of Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



Frederick Lincoln — Pianoforte. 

Born in Massachusetts. Graduated 
from New England Conservatory in 
1881. Studied with J. C. D. Parker, 
A. D. Turner, Carl Baermann, Carl 
Faelten and Stephen Emery. 




Emil Mahr — Violin and Viola. 

Studied with Joachim in B?rlin. 
Member of Wagner Festival Orches- 
tra in Bayruth. Joined the Faculty 
in 1887. 



19*3 



31 




F. Stuart Mason — Piano and Har- 
mony. 

Born in We3 month, Mass. Studied 
piano work with John Orth. Grad- 
uated from New England Con- 
servatory with highest honors in 1907 
under Dr. Jeffery in piano and G. W. 
Chadwick in composition. Studied 
in Paris under Isidore Philipp. 
Joined the Faculty in 1910. 




Carl Pierce — Violin. 

Born in Taunton, Mass. Studied 
with Leandro Campanari. For nine 
years in charge of Violin Department 
at the Boston Conservatory. Mem- 
ber of the Xew England Conservator}' 
Faculty since 1902. 



F. Addison Porter — Piano. 

Born in Dixmouth, Me. Graduated 
from the Xew England Conservatory 
under A. D. Turner, Stephen Emery, 
and G. W. Chadwick. Studied with 
Hoffman and Freitag in Leipsic. 
Head of Pianoforte Normal Depart- 
ment. 




32 



Ht}t jHzumt 



1913 




Louis Post — Bassoon. 

Born in Pomerania, Germany. Mem- 
ber of Boston Symphony Orchestra 
for many years. 



George W. Proctor — Piano. 

Born in Boston. Graduated from 
New England Conservatory in 1892. 
Studied with Lesehetisky In Vienna. 
Composition with Naunatil and Man- 
dyczewski; frequently soloist with 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, Kneisel 
Quartette, etc. 





Mme. Auglsto Rotoli — Italian. 

Born in Rome. Early education in a 
convent and French school in Rome. 
Studied singing with Signor Rotoli. 
Came to America in 1885. 



33 




Harry W. Redman — Harmony and 
Composition. 
Born in Mt. Carmel, 111. Pupil of G. 
W. Chadwick. Has composed much 
for voice, Piano and strings. 




Eustace B. Rice — Piano. 

Born in Wayland, Mass. Piano with 
Edwin Klahre and Carl Baerman of 
Boston. Organ with George E. Whit- 
ing and Henry Dunham; composition 
with Goetschins. 



Clara Rogers — Voice. 

Born in Cheltenham, England. 
Studied at the Leipsic Conservatory; 
piano under Moscheles and Plaidy: 
voice under Professor Goetze. Piano 
in Berlin under Von Biilow; voice 
under Frau Timmerman; voice in 
Italy under San Giovanni. Many 
years on concert and operatic stage 
in Europe and America. 




34 



W&t fttwmt 



1913 




Elizabeth I. Samuel, A.B. — Rhetoric, 
English and History. 
Born in Bennington, 111. Graduated 
from Mt. Holyoke; took a medical de- 
gree; special work at Boston Uni- 
versity. 




Sullivan A. Sargent — Voice. 

Born in Boston. Studied with George 
L. Osgood, Chas. R. Adams, Geo. J. 
Parker, Myron Whitney and Chas. 
A. White; composition with G. W. 
Chad wick. Joined the Faculty in 
1908. 



Hedwig Schroeder — Pianoforte. 

Born in Leipsic. Daughter of Alwyn 
Schroeder, the famous cellist. Studied 
with Carl Stasny, Heinrich Gebhard 
and Mme. Hopekirk. Joined Faculty 
in 1912. 



i9i3 



35 




David Sequeira — Pianoforte, Sight- 
ploying and Spanish. 
Born in Granada, Nicaragua. Gradu- 
ated from the New England Conserv- 
atory in 1904-06. Joined Faculty in 
1908. 




Clarexce B. Shirley — Voice. 

Born in Lynn, Mass. Studied with 
Chas. A. White in Boston and Du- 
bulle in Paris. One of the leading 
concert and oratorio tenors in New 
England. 




Arthur Shepherd — Harmony and 
Composition. 

Born in Paris, Idaho. Graduated 
from the New England Conservatory 
in 1897. Studied composition with 
Goetschius and Chadwick. Joined 
Faculty in 1908. 



• 



36 



1913 





Carl Stasny — Pianoforte. 

Born in Mainz, Germany. Studied 
with Ignaz Briill in Vienna, Wilhelni 
Kriiger in Stuttgart, and Franz Liszt 
in Weimar. 




Richard Stevens — Piano. 

Born in California. Graduated from 
the New England Conservatory in 
1904. Studied with Buonomici in 
Florence and Moskowski in Paris. 



Camille Thurwanger — French. 

Born and educated in Paris. Came 
to Boston in 1884, where he has 
given his time to teaching French. 
An authority on phonetics and 
French diction. 




* 



TLfyt fttumt 



37 



Clara Tourjee-Nelson — J'oice. 

Born in Rhode Island. Graduated 
from the New England Conservatory; 
studied with Augusta Rotoli, Mr. 
and Mrs. John O'Xeil and Sarah 
Fisher. 





William B. Tyler — Harmony and Sol- 
feggio. 

Born in Boston. Graduated from 
the New England Conservatory in 
1909. Studied counterpoint and com- 
position with G. W. Chadwick. 
Studied in Berlin with Wilhelm 
Klatte, and taught at the Stern Con- 
servatory in Berlin. Became a mem- 
ber of the Facultv in 1911. 



George Van Wieren — German. 

Born in Eddigehausen, near Gottin- 
gen, Germany. Graduated from Uni- 
versity of Gottingen in 1S77, with the 
degree of candidate of Theology and 
from the Teachers' Seminary in 
Hanover in 1S99. Instructor in Ger- 
man at Boston University. Joined 
the Facultv in 1901. 




38 



1913 




Frank S. Watson — Piano. 

Born in Rhode Island. Graduated 
from the New England Conservatory 
in 1905. Studied with Dr. Jeffery 
and Edwin Kiahre; composition with 
G. W. Chadwick. Member of the Fac- 
ulty since 1906. 




F. Morse Wemple — Voice. 

Born in Albany, X. Y. Studied with 
Charles A. White, Dubille in Paris, 
and Henry Russell. A well known 
church and concert singer. 



Charles A. White — Voice. 

Born in Troy, N. Y. Studied under 
Rebling and Grill at the Leipsic 
Conservatory; continued voice study 
with Lamperti. Organized and di- 
rected the Troy Choral Club until 
called to the New England Conserva- 
tory in 1896. 




39 



H. S. Wilder — Piano. 

Born in Worcester, Mass. Studied 
piano with B. D. Allen, B. J. Lang 
and A. K. Virgil. 





Felix Winternitz — Violin. 

Graduated from the Vienna Conserv- 
atory under Griin and Hellinesberger 
with highest honors; several concert 
tours in America; soloist with all 
chief orchestras. Joined the Faculty 
in 1899. 



Carl Baermann — Pianoforte. 

Born in Munich. Pupil of Wanner, 
Wohlmuth and Liszt. Studied com- 
position with Lachner. Taught in 
Munich Conservatory; came to 
America and settled in Boston in 
1881. A concert pianist of interna- 
tional reputation. 



40 



%%z iHtixmt 



1913 



Henry M. Dunham — Organ. 

Born in Brockton, Mass. Studied at 
the New England Conservatory under 
Whiting, composition under J. K. 
Paine. Well known church organist 
and composer. 



Arthur Hackecarth — French Horn. 

Born in Berlin, Germany. For twen- 
ty years a member of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. Joined the 
Faculty in 1908. 



Francis A. Henay — Hand Culture. 

Ecrn in Boston. Studied physical 
culture with Dr. A. Sargent of Cam- 
bridge. Assistant in Pianoforte Nor- 
mal Department. Joined the Faculty 
in 1889. 



Bertha Draper King. 

Dancing, all branches. 



191 3 



41 



Carl F. Ludwig — Tympani and Drums. 

Born in Dresden. Member of Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra. 



Maurice Parker — Voice. 

Born in Chicago. Studied with Carl 
Becker. For many years associated 
with Clara Munger. 



Harriet Shaw — Harp. 

Studied with John Thomas, Signor 
Lorenzi Hasselmans and others; 
counterpoint with Herman Kotsch- 
mar and G. W. Marston. 



A. J. Smith — Cornet. 

Born in Cambridge, Mass. Studied 
at the New England Conservatory. 
Member of Faculty since 1908. 



42 



'Cfjc fttvimt 



1913 



Virginia Stickney — Violoncello. 

Graduated from the New England 
Conservatory under Josef Adamow- 
ski. Member of the Faculty since 
1912. 



Mrs. Axxa Stovall-Lothiax — Piano. 

Born in Mississippi. Graduated from 
the New England Conservatory in 
1S95 under Carl Stasny. 



Rudolph Toll — Clarinet. 

Born in Davenport, Iowa. Studied 
composition with G. W. Chadwick; 
clarinet with Leon Powitan and Alex- 
ander Selmer at the Paris Conserva- 
toire; later with Georges Longy: 
member of the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra; joined the Faculty in 1909. 



-J 



Pernor Claste ®itktv$ 

Class Motto — "Learn to do by doing." 
Class Colors — Black and gold. 
Class Flower — Brown-eyed Daisy. 



President 

J 'ice-President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer 

Assistant Treasurer . 



Helen M. Fair 
Sara Helen Littlejohn 
Marguerite Neekamp 
Margaret Gere 
Clara Whipple 
Ruth Lucas 



fEttteriatnmrnt (EammxtUt 

Margaret Gere, Chairman. 

Clara Ingham 

Ellen Hinckley 

Alice Whitehouse 



OIlasH Day (Eotnmtttrp 



Margaret Gere, Chairman. 
Cl \ra Ingham 
Margaret Wing 
Ruth Fitch ett 



Margaret Kent 
Elizabeth Sise 
Maurice Mathews 
Joseph Derrick 



1913 



45 



Mentor Class iltsitorp 




HE Conservatory, as you well know, contains man}- specimens 
of plant life, collected from all parts of the universe, and 
varying in size, color and brilliancy. 



In October, 191 1, these various specimens of plant life were sent to 
Mr. Chadwick for examination. He selected the most desirable and most 
promising looking plants and consigned them to the care of his able 
helpers who were to do all in their power to make these plants develop 
and blossom as June roses in 19 13. 

Very shortly after this event, called the Junior entrance examination, 
when each one of us did his best to convince Air. Chadwick of our indi- 
vidual merit, we were called together and at this, our first class meeting, 
were put in a class by ourselves and iabeled "The Class of 1913." Thus 
we had the organization of this notable class late in October. 

We were entertained during cur Junior vear by Alpha Chapter, 
Sinfonia, at a musicale and reception on December the fourth. The pro- 
gram was up to the Sinfonia high standard and the reception was most 
enjoyable. On January ninth we were entertained by the Seniors. The 
affair was delightfully informal and the program extremelv interesting. 

The Junior Concert was a marked sunccess and the performers a 
credit to the class as a whole. 



program 



Saint-Saens 



Fantasie in Db major for Organ 
Mr. Howard Goding. 



Saint-Saens 



. . .Song, "La Cloche". . . 
Miss Mima Montgomery. 



Chopin 




j° r I Pianoforte 



H. Leonard 



Miss Claire G. Oakes. 
." Sur le Desir,"' Violin. 
Miss Louise Rinehart. 



Gounod 



Aria from " La Reine de Saba," " Plus grand dans son obscurite 
Miss Elizabeth Wood. 



Chopin .... 
Saint Saens 




a J or j, pianoforte 



Jensen 



Chopin 



Miss Sara Helen Little john. 
Song, " < ) lass' dich halten, gold'ne Stunde " 
Miss Marguerite Neekamp. 

. . . .Impromptu in F major, Pianoforte 

Miss Hazel Nutter. 



4^> 



1913 



Saint-Saens 



Aria from Samson and Delilah, " Printemps qui commence 

Miss Ruth Lucas. 

Sarabande and Gavotte 

Polonaise in Ad major, Opus 32 

Mr. Guy S. Maier. 



Bach . . 
Chopin 



YVe were again sent to Mr. Chadwick for examination early in June, 
191 2 — Senior examination. He found most of the plants he had per- 
mitted to be classed as 1913s, flourishing under the constant care given 
them by his many co-workers in the Conservatory. Thus we entered 
upon our life as the Senior class of the New England Conservatory. 

We have not had as many class parties this year as we had last, but 
we made up in quality what we lacked in quantity. We entertained the 
class of 1914 with a dance early in the year and it was a success in every 
way. On January the twentieth the Juniors proved to be charming hosts 
and hostesses, when they entertained us with a dance. 

As to the class of 19 1 3 as a whole, it is a "wonder." YVe have 
started various new movements and to show that we are in sympathy 
with the great reform movement of the day, we broke the precedent 
established by previous classes by electing for our Senior class president 
a woman. 

As Mr. Elson has spared us in his "great weeding-out" and has 
allowed us to pass through this stage of our development and on toward 
the goal of our desire, let us give thanks to our lucky numeral, '13. 

Xow as the time is drawing near for us to blossom forth as June 
roses, we are awakening to the realization of how much more than we at 
first imagined does it mean to us to go forth from this Conservatory as 
graduates and alumni of the school. 

We sincerely hope to go out as capable men and women, to represent, 
as we should, our beloved school wherever we may be called, and as 
June roses, sweeten and brighten the lives of all with whom we come in 
contact. 



Elotse Laxe. 



1913 



47 



Canbtbatesi for (Srabuatton 



Helen McClelland Fair. <t> At r. 
Saltsburg, Pa. 

"A presence ichich is not to be put by." 

In Pianoforte under Kurt Fischer. 
President of Senior class; Grand Ruler of 

Phi Mil Gamma; member of Netjme 

Board. 





Sara Helex Little johx. A X Q. 
1911 Sealy Ave., Galveston, Texas. 
"It isn't size that counts." 

In Pianoforte under Gecrge Proctor. 
Associate Editor of Thz Netjme. 
Vice-President of Senior Class. 
Winner of the Mason and Hamlin Prize. 



Margaret Gere, aI <£ E. 

Northampton, Mass. 
"Light's her heart and blithe' s her song. 

In Voice under Clarence B. Shirley. 
Corresponding Secretary of Senior class. 




48 



1913 




Clara Risa Olive Whipple 

202 West Brookline St., Boston, Mass. 

"Happy am I. from care I am free, 
Why ain't they all contented like me?' 

In Voice under Clarence B. Shirley. 

Treasurer of Senior class; Member 
Netjme Board. 



of 



Ella Rtth Lucas, <f» M r. 

1641 Hinman Ave., Evanston, 111. 

"A perfect woman, nobly planned. 
To warn, to comfort and command." 

In Voice under Charles A. White. 
Assistant Secretary of Senior class; Solo- 
ist at Cambridge Unitarian Church. 





Lou Margaret Adolph. <J> M r. 

Bridgeport, Ohio. 

''I've made it a practice to put all my 
icorries down in the bottom of my 
heart, then sit on the lid an' smile." 

In Pianoforte under George Proctor. 
Member of Netjme Board. 



1913 



49 




Natalie May Ashley. 

Deerfield, Mass. 

"And mistress of herself, though china 
fall." 

In Organ under Henry M. Dunham. 





Hazel M arie Barbiers, A X Q. 

540 Madison Ave., Albany, N. Y. 

"The worst fault you have is to be in 
love." 

In Pianoforte under the late Carl Baermann 

and Clayton Johns. 
Member of Neume Board. 




Florence May Bishop, A X Cl. 

44 Walnut Ave., Woodlawn, Wheeling, 
W. Va. 

"Even excellence is a degree of amiabil- 
ity." 

In Pianoforte under J. Albert Jeffery. 




5o 




Mary Wicks Boisseau, <t> M r. 

867 Baxton Ave., Danville, Va. 

"Life's a joke and all things slww it. 
I thought so once and now 1 knou it. 

In Voice under Sullivan A. Sargent. 



Florence Marion Brewer. 

38 Main St., Saugus, Mass. 

"With gracious speech to a77."' 

In Pianoforte under Alfred De Voto. 





Elizabeth Ella Burrill. 

56 Elm Ave., Brockton, Mass. 

"Yet teas it ne'er my fate from thee to find 
A deed ungentle nor a word unkind." 

In Pianoforte under Charles Dennee. 
Organist at South St. Methodist Church, 
Brockton, Mass. 



19*3 




■ 



Gladys Elma Cooper 

Xorthport, Maine. 
"A castle of thought upon her face 
That suited icell the forehead high. 
The eyelash dark and doicncast eye." 
In Pianoforte under Alfred De Voto. 




Glenn a Aileen Crosby. 

R. F. D. Xo. 3, Lowell, Mass. 
"Zealous yet modest." 
In Pianoforte under Charles Dennee 



Henrietta Damon. 

45 Bartlett St., Roxbury. Mass. 

"Wise to resolve and patient to perform.' 

In Pianoforte under Estelle Andrews. 



5-> 



TLty fttixmt 



1913 




Antonio De Lascia. 

24 Denmark St., Boston, Mass. 
"A friend to all who knew him." 
In Flute under Arthur Brooke. 



Mary Rose De Luc a. 

1ST Maverick St., East Boston, Mass. 

"Her looks do argue her 
Replete with modesty." 

In Pianoforte under Alfred De Voto. 




Joseph George Derrick. 

59 Sorento Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

"A neatly built little fellow, very spick 
and spajr" 

In Pianoforte under Edwin Klahre. 



19*3 



53 



Orra Rosamond Dolloff. 

650 Park Ave., Auburn. R. I. 

"The world's no better if we worry. 
Life's no longer if we hurry.'' 

In Pianoforte under Henry Goodrich. 





Howard Monroe Coding. 

29 Oakdale Ave.. East Dedhani, Mass. 

"A Lion among Ladies." 
Organist at St. Margaret's Church, Brigh- 
ton. 



54 



1913 




Amy Olive Goodspeed. 

Montgomery, Vermont. 

"With a smile that teas childlike and 
'bland.'" 

In Pianoforte under F. Addison Porter. 




Maud Lucille Gray. 

757 E. Walnut Ave., Frankfort, Ind. 

'Tis. alas, her modest, bashful nature 
that makes her silent." 

In Pianoforte under Kurt Fischer. 





Ellen Elizabeth Hinckley. 

49 Trinity St., New Britain, Conn. 

"7 do spy some marks of love in her." 

In Pianoforte under Alfred De Voto. 



1913 ^9* Qtumz 



Gladys Shirley Hunt. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. 

"Whose life end manners icell do paint 
Alike the student or the saint." 

In Pianoforte under Charles Dennee. 



f 




Freda Ames Hyde. 

208 Deering Ave.. Portland, Me. 

"Inconstant maid, that loveth all she 
sees." 

In Pianoforte under Alfred De Voto. 



Clara Elizabeth Ingham 
Brighton, Iowa. 

"0/ stature tall — / hate a dumpy woman." 

In Pianoforte under Charles Dennee. 
Secretary of X. E. C. Tennis Association. 




56 



'Zfyt fltiimt 



1913 




Dorothy Dudley Jordan. 

2152 Central Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

"Sincerity is an openness of heart." 

In Pianoforte under the late Carl Baer- 
mann and Lee M. Pattison. 



Margaret Anna Kent, A X Q. 

624 First St., South Boston, Mass. 
"Xeatness in moderation is a virtue." 
In Pianoforte under Anna Stovall-Lothian. 





Bertha Lora Lake 

47 Blaine St., Brockton, Mass. 

"Dreaming she hears not, neither does 
she see." 

In Pianoforte under Jane Foretier. 



1913 



fltume 



57 




Helen Whitney Lund. 

18 Loring Ave., Salem, Mass. 

"Gentle thoughts and calm elesires."' 

In Pianoforte under F. Addison Porter. 




;8 



W&z tfttumz 




Axtox Eugene Mainente. 

413 Ruggles St., Boston, Mass. 
"Perseverance wins success." 
In Flute under Arthur Brooke. 



Guy S. Maier, 3> M A., Sinfonia. 
174 Peckham St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
"A writer, a player, a talker, a fusscr — a 
horrible mixture." 
In Pianoforte under George Proctor. 
Editor-in-chief of the Neume. 





Maurice Monroe Mathews. 

Berwick, Maine. 

"You may have known that I am 
wordy man." 
In Violin under Emil Main-. 



no 




19^3 



59 



Mima Belle Montgomery. 

Salida, Col. 

"Beneath a countenance so grave 
She has all the icit she ought to have. 

In Voice under Charles White. 

Member of Neume Board. 




Hazel Belle Multer 

33 Cotting Ave., Marlboro, Mass. 

"Let such teach others icho themselves 
excel." 

In Pianoforte under Alfred De Voto. 



Cleora Adeline Nickles. 

14 Williams St., West Somerville, Mass. 
"Simplicity unadorned and blushing 
via je sty." 

In Organ under Homer Humphrey. 




6o 



1913 




Ella Catherine Nord, A X Q. 

18 Bowen St., Jamestown, N. Y. 
"Hoiv pure at heart and sound in head. 
In Pianoforte under Charles Dennee. 
Member of Neuiie Board. 



Claire Graham Oakes M E. 

554 East Taylor St., Portland, Ore. 

"The reason firm, the temperate will, 
Endurance, foresight, strength and skill." 

In Pianoforte under the late Carl Baermann 

and Alfred De Voto. 
Netjme Business Manager. President of N. 
E. C. Tennis Association. 





Mary Louise Powell. 

Huntsville, Texas. 

"Having wisdom with each studious 
year." 

In Pianoforte under Carl Stasny. 



i9 J 3 



61 



Evelyn Claire Quinn. 

47 Bicknell St., Dorchester, Mass. 

"Like a red. red rose." 

In Voice under Charles A. White. 





Frank Vernon Russell, <p M A., 
Sinfonia. 

74 Washington Park, Xewtonville, Mass. 
"Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more. 
Men icere deceivers ever." 
In Pianoforte under Edwin Klahre. 



Louise Claspill Rixehart. A X Q. 
Columbus, Ohio. 

"With gentle yet prevailing foree. 
Intent upon her destined course." 

In Violin under Timothee Adamowski. 




62 



TL\z iltcumt 



1913 




Raymond Clark Robinson. 

25 Dewey St., Worcester, Mass. 

"Of study took he most care and most 
heed." 

In Organ under Wallace Goodrich. 





Elizabeth Campbell Sise. 

87 Mystic St., West Medford, Mass. 

"Joy icas Duty and Love icas Laic." 

In Voice under Percv F. Hunt. 




Susan Adeline Snow. 

34 Crandall St., Adams, Mass. 

"Sober, steadfast and demure." 

In Pianoforte under Alfred De Voto. 




1913 



63 



aIarguerftf Spofford. 

High St., Claremont, N. H. 

"Thy voice is sweet, as if it took its 
music from thy face.'" 

In Voice under Charles A. White. 





Julia Swishfr. 

Sigourney, Iowa. 
"All that in woman is adored 
In thy dear self I find.''' 

In Pianoforte under Charles Dennee. 



Caroline Christina Tagen. 

46 Dorset St., Dorchester, Mass. 

"Silent and chaste she steals along, 
Far from the world's gay busy throng." 
In Pianoforte under F. Addison Porter. 




6a 



1913 




Marguerite Eloise Wheeler. 

171 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 

"Oh, this learning. icJiat a thing it is." 

In Pianoforte under F. Addison Porter. 





Helen Pearl Wilkins. 

22 Bartlett Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

"Still we went coupled and inseparable." 

In Pianoforte under F. Addison Porter. 



1913 



W&z flzumt 



65 



Margaret Crosby Wing. 

Waterville, Maine. 

"Light quirks of music, broken and un- 
even, make the soul dance upon a jig 
to heaven." 

In Pianoforte under Henry Goodrich. 





Elizabeth Nelson Wood. A X n. 
Winchendon, Mass. 

"She was a phantom of delight 

When first she gleamed upon my sight." 

In Voice under Charles A. White. 

Assistaint Business Manager of Netjme. 



Elizabeth Frances Young. 

Millsville, Pictou Co., Nova Scotia. 

"A maiden never bold." 

In Pianoforte under George Proctor. 




66 



'Cfje fttumt 



1913 




Helen Gertrude Chapin. 

935 Beacon St., Newton Centre, Mass. 

"Secret and self-contained 
And solitary as an oyster."' 

In Organ under Henry M. Dunham. 



Marguerite Catherine Neekamp 

4 South Second St., Ironton, Ohio. 

"Ever the same, serene and confident." 

In Voice under William H. Dunham. 
Recording Secretary of Senior class. 
Soloist at Methodist Episcopal Church. 
West Roxbury. 

Roscoe Raymond Ricker. 

24 Whitney Road, Quincy, Mass. 

"You may believe what he says and pawn 
your souls upon it." 

In Violin under Felix Winternitz. 

Jean Laura Stanley. 

32 Spring St., St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

"She hath a wisdom that doth guide her 
valor to act in safety." 

In Pianoforte under F. Addison Porter. 

Wanda Evalyn YVardell. 

38 Waverley St., Roxbury, Mass. 

"To see her is to love her, and love but 
her forever." 

In Pianoforte under Carl Stasny. 



19*3 



67 



Canbtbates for Soloists Btploma tn pianoforte 

of tfje Class of 1912 




John Thomas Cathey. 

227 South Sixth St., Gadsden, Ala. 

"Chesterfield and Cavalier combined.'' 

In Pianoforte under Charles Dennee- 



Ruth Lillian Fitchett. 

92 Wyoming Ave., Melrose, Mass. 

"A bloomy pair of vermeil cheeks 
Like Hebe's in her rudiest hours." 

In Pianoforte under Alfred De Voto. 




Josephine Smith, # M T. 

Bedford, Pa. 

"Oh. then. I saw her eye icas bright. 
A icell of love, a spring of delight. 

In Pianoforte under Kurt Fischer. 



68 



1913 



©be to tfje Class of 1913 

With hopes that ran high, we first saw these gray wails. 

Where enshrined was the Art we held dear : 
'Twas Music had lured us to these spacious halls, 

Yet we sought her with trembling and fear. 
For the Muse whom we love will not lightly be wooed. 

And the votaries to join her great choir, 
Must worship the beautiful, shun all the crude. 

If at length they would win hearts' desire. 

Creative art and kindred powers, 

With manifold gifts feed the flame ; 
They nurture, they guide and our youth richly dower 

With classic tradition and aim. 
With harmonies clear we have heard these walls sound. 

When a great master's hand touched the keys, 
And soft strains of melody float all around. 

Like the whisperings of winds through the trees. 

Inspired by rich teaching, we leave the main stream, 

To follow perchance but the rills ; 
Yet we've seen the vision, ami we've dreamed the dreams. 

Have lifted our eyes to the hills. 
But one shadow falls athwart our past joys. 

Through the mist fondest memories spring, 
No discord can rise, and no tears dim the eyes 

Whilst "the lark at heaven's gate sings." 

D. T. 



1913 




Junior Class* 



Adolph Yogel . 
Marion Feeley 
Lane Frisby 
Alfred Fischer 
Henry Dam sky 
Gladys G. Hunt 

finance Committee 

Alice Dayis 

Dorothy Hills 

loretta curley 



President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 
Assistant Treasurer 

^S^sXavv Committee 

Alice Dayis 

Hester Deasey 

Lyle Trusselle 

Samuel Goldberg 



Bmblem Committee 

Hester Deasey 

Dora Elizabeth Gilbert 

Marjorie Gaskins 

Lillian Carpenter 

Laura Venable 



Social Committee 

Belle Gardiner 

Ann Eliza Whitten 
Agnes Gottschalk 
Samuel Goldberg 
Lyle Trusselle 



Itteume Committee 

Roberta Kennard Edith Berggren 

Beatrice Xyman Hester Deasey 

Henry Dam sky 





HENRY DAMSIO 
Treasurer 



GLADYS G. HUNT 
Assistant Treasurer 



/2 



fltumt 



1913 



Junior Cto Boll 



pianoforte 



MARGUERITE LOUISE BARNES 

MILDRED MADOLIN BECROFT 

ELVIRA FRANCIS BENSAIA . 

EDITH MARIE BERGGREN 

EMMA FILLSBURY B LA NCHARD 

GRACE CURRIER BROWN 

JULIA COLEMAN CALLAHAN . 

LILIAN MAE CARPENTER 

ISABEL WADS WORTH CLARK 

LENORA CHARLOTTE CLARK 
ANNA BEATRICE COG AN . 

URANIA REATER COLLINS 

MAYBELLE COX 

CLARA DAVIE S . 

MAYBELLE DAY .... 

HESTER JOSEPHINE DEASEY 

ALITA DREW FAMES . . . 

EDITH CAROLINA EKLUND . - 

MARION CAROLINE ELEGATE 

MAE GLADYS COTTON 

GERTRUDE WILHELMINA COTTON 

EDNA ALICE ELDRIDGE . 

ROBERTA HILLBOW EVANS . 

CREOLA OLIVE FORD 

LANE FRISBY .... 

ELISE MATILDA FULTON 

MAR JORIE GASKINS 

EVELYN E. GONDER 

MARION SHAW GOODRICH 

SAMUEL LOUIS GOLDBERG 

RUTH MARIE GORMAN . 

AGNES GOTTSCHALK 

MYRTHA MARIE GUNDERSON 

A L VERA CAROLINE GUSTAFSON 



. WAT E R T O W N . MASS 

WALLINGFORD. CONN. 

SOMERVILLE. MASS. 

WORCESTER. MASS. 

WEST MEDFORD. MASS. 

. CONCORD, N. H. 

. CAROLINA. R. I. 

. BRISTOL, CONN. 

PORTLAND. ORE. 

ARROYO GRANDE, CAL. 
STONEHAM. MASS. 

HAVERHILL. MASS. 

WOONSOCKET. S. D. 

BROOKLINE. MASS. 

CAMBRIDGE. MASS. 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

WORCESTER. MASS. 

GLOVERSVILLE, MASS. 

WEST NEWTONVIL.LE, MASS. 

WEST NEWTONVILLE. MASS 

LONG BEACH, CAL. 

REISTERSTOWN, MD 

EXCELSIOR SPRINGS. MO. 

BETHANY, MO. 

. MADDEN, MASS. 

SUNBURY. PA. 

STRASBURY. PA. 

ROSLINDALE. MASS. 

DORCHESTER. MASS. 

DORCHESTER. MASS. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 

. ST. PAUL. MINN. 

FLORENCE. MASS. 



mc 



73 



ESTHER HALEY 
HELEN W. HERTRICH 
MARY MARGARET BIGGINS 
DOROTHY VERNON II ILK 
MARY ALICE HOLMAN 
GLADYS GILBERT HUNT . 
VERA MINNIE JOHNSON . 
ESTHER CROSBY KELLOGG 
ROBERTA KENNARD 
EDNA IRENE KLaR . 
EMILIE KLEBERG 
MARTHA MADELIENS LINTON 
CLARA ALENA LIYERMORE 
EDITH LAURA LONGLEY 
FLORENCE ETHEL MASON 
GRACE M-COY 
EVA S. M (RTENSEN . 
EVA MARIE MOUTON 
JENNETTE LINDSAY NORTH 
MARY ALICE NO YES . 
BEATRICE LEAH NYMAN 
WILLIE JUNE PADDOCK 
BESSIE KELLER PHILLIPS 
MARION BREED PROCTOR 
BEATRICE RAGSDALE 
MABEL LOUISE RATH BONE 
PALMYRA PAULINE REZENOES 
RALPH WEST RHOADS . 
ARMIDA HALL RICHARDSON . 
GERHARD CALVIN RINGGENBERG 
HERBERT W. RINGWALL 
ALDINE JANE SAWTELL 
EVA ROBINS SEMPLE 
EDITH AYLES WORTH SHAH 
ETHEL FLORENCE SILVER 
CHARLES OSCAR SINK . 
CELIA FRENCH SMITH . 
LILLIE SMITH . 
HELEN MARIE SOHLBERC 



ME 



BIDDEFORD. ME. 
SPRAGUE. WASH. 
WELLS VI LLE. N. Y. 
DELAWARE. O. 
PORTLAND. ORE. 
STRONDSBURG. PA. 

NORTHFIELD. VT. 
RROOKLINE. MASS. 
• iLENDORA. CAL. 
MIDDLEBORO. MASS. 
GALVESTON. TEX. 
CLINTON. MASS. 
MEDFORD. MASS 
. AYER. MASS. 
SPRIXGFIELD. MASS. 

SPRAGUE. WASH. 
DORCHESTER. MASS. 

. LAFAYETTE. LA. 
ROSLIXDALE. MASS. 
VIXALHAVEX. ME. 
LROSE HIGIILAXDS. MASS 
RAWLET. VT. 
. STROXDSBURG. PA. 
. WEST LYNX. MASS. 
. MADILL. OKLA. 
BOSTOX. MASS. 
SOMERVILLE. MASS. 
LEBAXOX. PA. 
BAR HARBOR. ME. 
. AMES. IOWA 
BAXGOR. ME. 
ORANGE, MASS. 
SOMERVILLE. MASS. 
MANCHESTER CTR.. VT. 
. ALLSTON. MASS. 
LEXINGTON. N. C 
BUCKSPORT. ME. 
. ELLERTON. GA 



74 



1913 



PEAKL NANNIE TALBOT .... 
i;LADYS LOUISE THAYER 

DAISY MAUD WEBB 

MARION ELIZABETH WEBSTER . 
ETHEL HUNTER WHITE .... 
GLADYS ALMA WHITMORE 
GERTRUDE FAY WHITTEMORE . 
ANN ELIZA WHITTEN .... 
DOROTHY CAROLINE WILLIS 

Voice 

MAUDE A. BEAUDRY 
AGNES MARIE BLAIN 
ANITA ELIZABETH BOWLES . 
LAURA LUCILLE BROWN 
LOR ETTA CATHRYNE CUR LEY 
ALICE PALMER DAVIS . 
MARION ANNA FEELEY 
BELLE ELIZABETH GARDNER 
DURA ELIZABETH GILBERT . 
JURY LUCINDA GILCHRIST . 
ROSE MARIE LEYERONI . 
ELIZABETH FORD LONGSTREET 
HELEN MARTHA OSBURN 
MARION GERTRUDE PHINNEY 
AGNES DONALDSON REID 
LYLE PORTER TRUSSELLE . 
LAURA ALICE TENABLE . 



MRS. CHARLOTTE LINNELL WRYE BOSTON. MASS 

Or 9 an 

LELIA MAYBELLE HARVEY MILTON. MASS 

VERA MINNIE JOHNSON NORTHFIELD. VT. 

JOSEPH GEORGE DERRICK SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 

KATHLEEN WRIGHT LOWELL. MASS 

Utclmcellc 

ADOLPH HENRY TOGEL. JR W. ORANGE. N. J. 

Clarinet 

HENRY DAMSKY MIDDLEBORO. MASS. 

EDNA KLAR BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 



flute 



. BROWNWOOD. TEX. 
. ROXBURY. MASS. 
ARDMORE. OKLA. 
. NORTHFIELD. MASS. 
. EVERETT. MASS. 
. LOWELL. MASS. 
SKOWHEGAN. ME 
POINT PLEASANT. W. VA. 

MANSFIELD. MASS. 



NEW YORK. N. Y. 
MOBILE. ALA. 
. BROOKVILLE. PA. 
PITTSFIELD. MASS 
ROCHESTER. N. Y. 
BROOKLINE. MASS. 

ROXBURY. MASS. 
CAMBRIDGE. MASS. 
HARTFORD. CONN. 
BOSTON. MASS. 
BRIGHTON. MASS 
. DU BO IS. PA. 
DORCHESTER. MASS. 
. BALTIMORE. MD. 
BOSTON. MASS 
ROANOKE. VA. 



ALFRED HALL FISHER 



JAMAICA PLAIN. MASS. 



, 7 



Junior Class &tston> 

gX OTHER school year has passed at the Conservatory and we 
find yet another Junior Class enrolled in the records of our 
, Alma Mater: a Junior Class that is worthy of its name: one 
of the best and I believe the largest ever enrolled upon the records of the 
school. 

The class was first called together by Mr. Chadwick on October 30. 
1912. at which time he delivered a short address, wishing the class a suc- 
cessful school year, which, by the way. is drawing to a close: and one that 
the president feels is a splendid success for the Class of 1014. The Class 
pin selected is of a decidedly original design, and the Class colors are 
purple and gold, with the jonquil as the Class flower. 

We encountered no difficulty whatever in getting a large attendance 
of Juniors to participate in class socials, as was evident by the large num- 
ber of Juniors that at ended the informal dance given by the Seniors of 
November 30. [912. 

The first class social. "An Acquaintance Party." was arranged by the 
entertainment commitee and given in the Sinfonia Fraternity rooms on 
the evening of December 12. with the result that good class spirit has 
been strongly established. 

A dance was tendered the Seniors on February 20. which was a de- 
cided success, owing to the splendid work of the entertainment commit- 
tee and the hearty support of the Juniors. I can say very little in regard 
to our ' Junior Concert." as it is to be held at a late date, but all members 
are working to make this the greatest event on our calendar. 

So much for the historical events, and now for a personal word to 
the Juniors. I have tried to give the best of my interest and ability for 
the good of the class, and allow me to take this opportunity to thank all 
members of 19 14 for their hearty support, because we all know that it 
is the Class as a whole that accomplishes our ideas. W ishing the best 
success to each and even- member on their Senior entrance exams, and 



^fie fttume 



i9 T 3 



may we all meet here again next year, as Seniors of the New England 
Conservatory of Music, ready to devote our interest to our studies and 
to establish even a stronger feeling of good fellowship and a higher 
standard of musicianship on the last lap of our long looked for goal, that 
of becoming — an Alumnus of our Alma Mater. 

Adolph Vogel. 



1913 



National Wftrrra 

Ossiax E. Mills, Alpha, . . . Honorary Supreme President 
Percy J. Burrell, Alpha, .... Supreme President 
Burleigh E. Jacobs, Epsilon, . Supreme Secretary-Treasurer 

Harry D. Kaiser, Beta, .... Supreme Historian 



Honorary Members. 



Geo. W. Chadwick 
Henry Russell 
Wallace Goodrich 

Alplja 

F. Otis Drayton 
Lee M. Pattison 
Henry Goodrich 
Wilhelm J. Kaiser 
Theo. E. R. Gundrey 
Ossian E. Mills 
E. Roland Reason er 
Carl FARNS^YORTH 



Geo. B. Cortelyou 
Louis C. Elson 
Eben D. Jordan 

(Eljautrr ©ffirrra 

President 
First Vice-President 
Second Vice-President 
Recordina Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 
Warden 
Librarian 



1913 



79 



Active Members. 



CHARLES H. BENNETT 
CHESTER C. COOK 
HARLOWE F. DEAN 
HENRY DAMSKY 
F. OTIS DRAYTON 
ALFRED P. FISCHER 
CARL J. FARNS WORTH 
HENRY M. GOODRICH 
THEO. E. R. GUN DRY 
JAMES W. HUFFMANN 
WILHELM J. KAISER 



GUY S. MALER 
OSSIAN E. MILLS 
LEE M. PATTISON 
C. ROLAND REASONER 
EUSTACE B. RICE 
FRANK B. RUSSELL 
ARTHUR SHEPHERD 
WM. B. TYLER 
ADOLPH VOGEL, Jr. 
GEORGE A. WEBSTER 
F. MORSE WEMPLE 



DANIEL AYARXER 



Affiliated Alumni Members. 



HARRY Y. BOYLES JOHN K. SNYDER 

KEITH C. BROWN RAYMOND A. SIMONDS 

PERCY E. BURRELL HERBERT C. SEILER 

HARRY F. FAIRFIELD AUGUSTO VANNINI 

H. CHANDLER WELLS 



81 



$Jn Jflu &lpfm— ^tnfonta 

^ CT tne present time Alpha Chapter, Sinfonia, has an active 
K I membership of twenty-three men and we can honestly and 
J_ M proudly say that each and every one of the twenty-three is 
working and striving to attain the great objects of Sinfonia and one of 
them in particular. 

''The advancement of music in America and a loyalty to the 
Alma Mater." 

Each individual in Alpha Chapter is doing all he can to promote 
the welfare and advancement of music in America, and the chapter as 
a whole is striving for the same. Go a little deeper into the matter and 
you see what Sinfonia did at its last convention in Boston, May 29th, 
30th and 31st, 19 1 2. 

A cash prize of one hundred dollars and a gold medallion was 
offered for the best string quartette submitted during the season of 
1912-1913. Possibly next year there will be a prize for an overture, 
and in a few years Sinfonia will be offering a larger amount of money 
for the best opera written by an American. 

This year a series of ''Table Talks" were provided by our wide- 
awake Entertainment Committee, and they have proved to be of more 
than ordinary interest. It was indeed a privilege for Sinfonians to 
listen to the wise sayings of such men as Hon. Bro. L. C. Elson, Hon. 
Bro. Geo. W. Chadwick, Hon. Bro. Wallace Goodrich, Mr. Henry L. 
Mason and Dr. E. Charlton Black. 

Other occurrences worthy of mention were the annual Sinfonia 
theatricals in Jordan Hall last April, the annual concert, Sorority night, 
the Sinfonia banquet and many other minor events. 

Since last year, there has been one new chapter added to our list, 
which now numbers thirteen active chapters. We trust that number 
fourteen will follow immediately — oh, no ! We are not at all super- 
stitious. 

Sinfonia wishes every member of the Senior class Godspeed, and 
the heartiest best wishes for future success. 



82 



i9 x 3 



(Founded in 1885 af Depauw 1'nk crsity.) 
Zeta Chapter. 

alice baldwin 

hazel barriers 

maud be audrey 

matt) briggs 

florence bishop 
florence cook 

olive cutter 

ava dodge 

marjorie gaskins 

amy lit a gardner 

louise kelley 

margaret a. kent 

eloise lane 

sara helen littlejohn 
mary mitche ll 

ella nord 

beryl nutter 

lois nagle 

florence o'neil 

mildred ridley 

louise rinehart 

willie kate travis 

george thonssen 

ann eliza whitten 

mildred wright 

elizabeth wood 



Zeta Zeta Chapter. 



WINIFRED BYRD 

BLANCHE BROCKLEBANK. *12 

MRS. ARTHUR ROY KAISER 
ANNIE MAY COOK 

SUSAN DOWNING 

JOSEPHINE DURRELL 

MRS. ESTELLE M. DUNKLE 

MRS. JOSEPHINE FREEMAN HALEY 

MRS. WILLIAM HARRINGTON 
MRS. LILLIAN GOULSTON McMASTERS 
KATHARIN E MONTGOME R Y 

GLADYS L. OLMSTEAD 

MRS. EVANGELINE BRIDGE STEVENSON 



83 



Honorary Members. 



UME. ADELE AOS DEB OHE 

MRS. II. EL A. BEACH 

MME HELEN HOPEKIRK 

MME. FANNIE BLOOMEIELD ZEISLER 

MM E. ANTOINETTE SZ1 MOWSKA 

MISS MARGARET RUTHYEN LANG 

MISS MAUD POWELL 

MME. JULIE RIVE-KING 

MISS ELLEN BEACH YAW 

MME. MARIA DECCA 

MRS. HENRY HOWE LATIN 

MISS NEALLY STEYENS 

MISS ADELE VERNE 



Patronesses of Zeta Chapter. 

MRS. MABEL S T A N A W A Y - B B I G < * s 

MRS. HENRY M. DUNHAM 

MRS. RALPH L. FLANDERS. 

MRS. PERCY F. HUNT 

MRS. CLARA TOUR JEE-NELSON 

MRS. CHARLES A. WHITE 



t 

t I J * * 

1 



ft t * 

f 1 



ALPHA CHI OMEGA SORORITY 



1913 



tlt)e fitixmt 



85 



^tlpfja Cfn <0mega 

HLPHA Chi Omega was first organized as a strictly musical 
sorority, but as it grew in size it was found necessary to 
make a change in its policy and since 1903, it has admitted 
students from the liberal arts departments of universities and colleges 
where there is a school of music. There are now in the sorority 
eighteen active and eight alumnae chapters. The total membership is 
eighteen hundred. 

Zeta chapter was organized in 1895 and has been very active in 
Conservatory affairs since that time. She endeavors to uphold a lofty 
standard of womanhood and scholarship before her members and thus 
develops the best that is in each individual girl. A scholarship is 
given each year to the girl who proves herself most worthy of assist- 
ance and it is the hope of the sorority to enlarge this fund greatly. 

The alumnae chapter, Zeta Zeta, consists of girls, nearly all of 
whom at one time were prominent in Conservatory life, and it is 
indeed a great privilege to have this organization so close at hand to 
the active chapter, so that the latter may be aided and advised by her 
older sisters. 

Zeta holds weekly meetings in the chapter room, and these are 
full of interest to every member. There are several social affairs 
given each year too, and these serve to add pleasure not only to the 
Alpha Chis, but also, we hope, to many of the sorority's friends 



IQI3 



^I5r Intuitu 



s- 



Active Members. 



LOU ADOLPH 
LEA I I A LMY 
ARLENE ATKINS 
MARION BIDWELL 
MARY BOISSEAU 
LUCILLE BROWN 
MARION CONGER 
CATHERINE CROWLEY 
HELEN FAIR 
HERA GILBERT 
MARION HEERMANS 



DELLA HOOVER 
GLADYS BUNT 
SIGNE JOHNSON 
RUTH LUCAS 
CHARLOTTE MILES 
CECILE WELCH 
AGNES REID 
ARMIDA RICHARDSON 
JOSEPHINE SMITH 
LUCY WALKER 
ETHEL WAKEFIELD 
CAROLYN RANGER 



Honorary Members. 



MRS. CARL BALE MANN 
MME. RAMON BLAN CHART 
MRS. CHARLES DENNEE 
MRS. MINNIE MADDER N- PI SKE 
MRS. WALLACE GOODRICH 



MRS. LILLA ORMOND KELSEY 
MRS. CLARA K. ROGERS 
MME. AUGUSTO ROTOLI 
MME. MARCEL LA SEMBRICH 
MRS. E. MORSE WEMPLE 



Affiliate Members. 



MRS. HAZARD 



MISS IIADLEY 

MRS. DOLLOFF 



88 



1913 



FOUNDED OCTOBER 17. 1898, AT HOLL1NS, VA. 

Colors: Turquoise Blue and Black 
Flowers: Pink Roses and Forget-Me-Nots 
Jewels: Pearls and Turquoise 




HE Phi Mu Gamma Sorority was founded in Hollins College, 
Hollins. Virginia, in 1898. The local chapter. Eta, is now six 
years old and is looking forward to a long and prosperous life 



in the Conservatory. This year the chapter is particularly strong, num- 
bering twenty-three members. All these girls are enthusiastic workers 
for the sorority and the school, and try to make whatever is under- 
taken, a success. 

Eta Chapter maintains a scholarship fund, which is constantly 
increasing. But all of its activities are not confined to the sorority; 
for instance, at Christmas time this year, the girls did some active 
charity work in the slum sections of Boston. 

The annual convention of the Sorority was held during the 
Christmas holidays, at Old Point Comfort. Virginia. The delegates 
were the guests of Alpha Chapter. Eta's delegate was Helen Fair. 
Miss Fair was elected President of the Grand Council, at this conven- 
tion, to succeeed Mrs. Annette Tiller Brittain. Eta is very proud of 
Miss Fair, who has been president of the chapter for three years. 

Of the girls who left the school last spring, several are teaching the 
various branches of music ; May Haskins is doing studio work in 
Louisville, Ky., Martha Hadley is doing concert work and teaching 
privately in Fall River and Cambridge, and Edith Bell is at home. 

Several social affairs have helped to make the memory of the 
past year a very happy one. AYe have had the pleasure of entertaining 
our sister sororites at tea, and of joining with them and the Sinfonians 
in giving the annual Hellenic dance and in several enjoyable parties. 

The Chapter's annual dance given in Riverbank Court, Cam- 
bridge, was a great success. It was an unusual pleasure to us to have 
the mothers of four of our girls acting as patronesses. 

It is the hope of Eta Chapter that whatever influence, it may 
stand always for what is best and highest in student life. 



90 



1913 



Active Members, 



NATALIE ASHLEY 
ANNA M. BAKER 
FRANCIS R. BOELEN 
ADA CHAD WICK 
EVALYN CRAWFORD 
ALICE DAVIS 
MAYBELLE DAY 
ALICE DUFFY 
ELLA DYER 
CREOLA FORD 
CONSTANCE FREEMAN 
AUGUSTA GENTSCH 



GERTRUDE GENTSCH 
MARGARET GERE 
DOROTHY HILLS 
ROSETTA EIRSCH 
CAMILLA JOBES 
OR A LARTHARD 
BLANCHE MORRILL 
CLAIRE G. OAKES 
LUTIE POFFENJBARGER 
GLADYS SIEVERLING 
PEARL SEILER 
PEARL TALBOT 
LYDIA WHITE 



Honorary 

MME. CECILE CHAMINADE 
Miss GERALDINE b aRRAR 
JANE OSBORN liANNAH 
MME. SCH1 MANN-HEINK 
MME. LOUISE HOMER 
MISS TINA LERNER 

Patronesses of 

MRS. WALLACE GOODRICH 

MRS. KATHARINE RIDGE W A Y HUN T 

MRS. HENRY L. MASON 

MRS. SULLIVAN SARGENT 

MRS. C B. SHIRLEY 

MRS. GRACE BONNER WILLIAMS 



Members. 

MISS ALICE NIELSEN 
MISS KATHLEEN PARLOW 
MISS OLGA STEEB 
MISS MAGGIE TEYTE 
MARIA YON UNSCHULD 
MRS. GRACE BONNER WILLIAMS 

Beta Chapter. 

MRS. T I MOTH EL ADAMOWSKI 
MRS. E. CHARLTON BLACK 
MRS. GEO. W. CHADWICK 
MRS. WM. H. DUNHAM 
MRS. F. S. CONVERSE 
MRS. RALPH L. FLANDERS 



1913 



ctjr j^runtr 



QI 



3n fflnnonam 

Genevieve Baker. 

HEX a noble life is taken from our midst we can onlv won- 
der why so much that is pure and lovely must go so far be- 
yond the reach of those that found their inspiration in that 
life; wonder, and then be thankful that we were privileged to know 
that person and to be associated, even indirectly with that sweet true 
influence. So do we feel toward the sister we lost Dec. 4, 1912. 

In Nov., 1910. Mrs. l>aker became a member of Mu Phi Epsilon 
and just what she brought to the sorority, only the members can fully 
appreciate. The exceptional musical ability that had placed her 
among the best pianists in the Conservatory, was the pride of her 
sorority sisters : the personality that endeared her to everyone, some- 
thing- for them to know ami revere beyond expression. Onlv two 
short years was she with us and how much those two years meant! It 
was our privilege to know her in an intimacy which not all could 
enjoy, to feel the strength and sweetness of her perfect womanhood, 
to strive for a nearer approach to the ideal which she set before us. 




9 2 



1913 



U Phi Epsilon, a strictly musical sorority, was founded in the 
Metropolitan College of Music, Cincinnati, Ohio, November 
*3> r 9°3- ^ e °ow have chapters in fifteen well known 
musical institutions, and several Alumnae Clubs. 

Beta Chapter was reinstalled at the Xew England Conservatory, 
November 5, 1909. During the past year we have greatly enjoyed our 
study of modern opera which proved a delightful diversion from 
our regular musical studies. 

Our social program has included a number of parties and teas be- 
side our musicale and reception which was given on November 
twenty-eighth. The greatest event, however, was our National Con- 
vention held here in April. The pleasure of meeting the girls from 
other chapters, the inspiration in being so close to one another for 
those three short days, cannot be overestimated and Beta received a 
stimulus for better and broader fraternity work that must bring re- 
sults. 

AYe consider Tina Lerner and Maggie Teyte remarkable ad- 
ditions to our honorary list. Both received the girls with especial 
graciousness and we were happy to spend a delightful hour with each 
of these young artists whose tours of this country during the past 
season have been notable for their phenomenal success. 




1913 



93 



dje Hellenic is>ocietp 

HE Hellenic Society of the X. E. C. celebrated another birth- 
day early in the fall. Xo torchlight parades marked the oc- 
casion, bin we did elect officers and discuss definite plans of 
action. In some of our plans we were successful. In February, we 
gave a dance at the Copley Plaza, for the benefit of the scholarship 
funds. This undertaking required a great deal of courage, but ask any- 
one who had the privilege of attending the dance if it was worth 
while? 

The affair was a success because of the united effort of all the 
members. It is needless to say that the scholarship funds grew. 

Recently a constitution has been drawn up and adopted. The 
society has often been criticised because of the lack in this respect. Our 
aim has always been to promote scholarship, friendship and helpful- 
ness. Xow, with a firm basis and with the purpose and ideals which 
the societv has always held, we look forward to a bright future. Let 
us hope that many illustrious names will adorn her rolls and much 
be accomplished by those whom she sends forth. 

E. M. \Y. 




(3ffurrs 



Ethel M. Wakefield 
Helex Fair . 
Chester S. Cook 
Ava Dodge 
Dura Gilbert 
Alice Duffy 
Mr. Rice 
Sara Helex Littlejohx 
Mr. Mills 



President 
First Vice-P res id cut 
Se co iid Jlr e -P res id cut 
Third J T ice-President 
R e c or din y Seer eta ry 
Treasurer 
Assistant Treasurer 
Co rrespo nd in a Sec ret a ry 
Auditor 



94 



1913 



0ih Conaertmtorp Bapg 

By Louis C. Elson. 

IN this year of grace 1913, when the New England Conservatory 
of Music stands well at the head of all American Music 
Schools, very few remember the institution when it was in its 
more experimental stages, and fewer still remember that genial and 
persuasive nature which ruled the school when it was in Music Hall 
Place and in Franklin Square. 

Dr. Eben Tourjee, its founder, was an enthusiast, yet a diplomat. 
Quite short in stature, blond of complexion, he always had a smile 
and the most pleasant expression imaginable. Some imagine that he 
was intensely religious ; he was devout, yet never obtruded his creed 
or belief upon anyone. He had a suave manner of obtaining what he 
wished from almost everybody. 

I can well recall when he pushed me into Theory teaching. The 
beloved Stephen A. Emery was ill, and the classes were languishing. 
I was then teaching vocal w r ork. Walking along the corridor Dr. 
Tourjee led me towards the room where a class was assembled. He 
represented to me the need of giving them a little general musical 
advice. "Just as you do in your lectures," said he. He painted the 
need of the work eloquently : he opened the class-room door ; he 
walked me in, "Mr. Elson will give you a lesson today," he said, and 
before I knew it I was launched upon a new and untried field. 

I found the need of a systemized course and began to formulate 
it from that moment. Some of the questions put to the pupils before 
that time, were, to say the least, rather vague. I doubt if I could 
have pasesd one of the older Musical Culture examinations. "How 
should the study of music affect our views of life in general?" was 
one question. "Why do we study music?" was another, to which a 
blunt pupil replied, "To make money !" 

It has been asserted that Dr. Tourjee was not a trained musician. 
This j> untrue. But he was by no means upon the level of many, 
from Mr. Chadwick downwards, who are working in our Conservatory 



1913 



95 



today. Had he been as advanced as these, had he attempted anything 
like our present curriculum, he would have been in advance of the 
American epoch in which he lived, and his Conservatory would have 
been empty. He was emphatically the man for his time, founding a 
course which was not too abstruse for the average student of that 
time, yet affording all necessary opportunities for such earnest ones 
as were determined upon a higher career. 

The names of some of the teachers of the olden days may show 
this. There was Lyman Wheeler, and Harry, his brother, as thorough 
in vocal work as any to be found today. There was John O'Xiel, the 
teacher of Madame Nordica, and she has often acknowledged that 
her vocal success was chiefly due to him. There was George E. 
Whiting and S. B. Whitney for organ work. Stephen A. Emery for 
harmony. J. C. D. Parker and Otto Bendix for piano. And there 
were many others. 

I began my lectures in the Music Hall building in Room 13. I 
suppose it was called "Room 13" because there was just about room 
for 13 people within its walls. When I had twenty in the audience I 
could boast of speaking to a crowded house. It was the day of small 
beginnings. One day Dr. Tourjee thought that it might be well to 
found an orchestra. Therefore he invited all the students who played 
any orchestral instrument to meet him in the hall the next Thursday 
evening. They came, — 21 of them. Two brought violins. Nineteen 
brought flutes ! The orchestra was not founded. Think of that, you 
students who have heard Mr. Chadwick's Concervatory orchestra 
play all of Beethoven's symphonies except the ninth ! 

In those early days I devoted Mondays to general lectures, but 
on Thursdays we took a wider scope. There was a box in the cor- 
ridor, into which pupils might drop any question they pleased. Thurs- 
days were devoted to answering these questions. If ever I had a 
versatile course it was in the emptying of that question-box and com- 
menting on the contents. Without applying the proverb that "a fool 
can ask more questions in a minute than a wise man can answer in a 
lifetime," let me state emphatically that my early decay and generally 
crumbling condition was due to the question-bcx almost entirely. 
However, we always enjoyed the Thursday afternoons, even if I did 
have to dodge occasionally. 

And under it all there was a family feeling that I have never 
found in any Conservatory on earth. Everyone knew the teacher, and 



k)G W&t iRtume 1913 



the teacher knew everyone. All were approachable and even the 
dullards found some one to help them over difficult places. Such a 
Conservatory would be decidedly out of place nowadays, when the 
higher education is making such inflexible demands. But one may be 
excused for growing enthusiastic over its pleasanter sides and for pay- 
ing a loving tribute to the man whose kindly presence permeated it 
all — Dr. Eben Tourjee. 

# 



i9i3 



7L§e j3euttu 



97 



9 &i)tal of Uprics 

By E. Charlton Black. 

Dtolet anD IRosematE 

Last May-day by the wooden strand 
That belts the ocean of the west, 

I laid a violet in the hand 
'Of her I loved the best. 

And now, where the long western wave 
Breaks soft on sand and loud on stone, 

The rosemary is on her grave, 
And I am all alone! 

:©£ Gbe Sea 

Along the downs the dawn lies red, 

And grey along the sea; 
It lays its rose-leaves on the bed 
Of white, where she is lying dead, 

That was so much to me. 

They'll lay her where the sea-birds cry 

Beside the sobbing sea; 
There through the long, dim years she'll lie, 
And this must be, until I die, 

A lonely world to me. 

Spbere /llbuetc 

The moon has left the coast of cloud 

And sails into the open sky — 
A ship of gold, with banners proud, 

And pennons streaming high. 

She sails into the azure sea, 

And from her decks of quivering light, 
There comes in mystic waves to me 

The music of the night. 

Oh, let me hear, with reverent ear, 
Those strains of spheral minstrelsy, 

That tell of hope that knows no fear, 
And love that cannot die! 




LOUIS C. ELSON 



1913 



99 




OR thirty-three years, since 1881, Louis C. Elson has served 
the New England Conservatory in one capacity or another. 
For a long time he has been at the head of the Theory De- 



partment where he has evolved a course that is second to none among 
the music schools of this country. He is a critic, writer and lecturer 
of wide reputation. His musical text-books, humorous works, bio- 
graphies and histories are read everywhere. For many years he has 
been musical editor of the Boston Advertiser and regular contributor 
to "Die Musik," the "Revue Musicale," the "Etude," etc. ; has given 
two series of lectures in the Lowell Institute — an exceptional honor; 
he is the official musical lecturer of the city of Boston, and has de- 
livered 250 talks in this course alone. At present he is at work on 
two new books; his classes at the Conservatory are crowded; his 
lectures are more numerous than ever'; and his life is crowded with 
the activities of a man who has now reached the high-water mark 
of his achievements. His genial smile, his youthful enthusiasm, his 
large-heartedness, his optimism and his sterling musicianship have 
endeared him, Elson the man, the teacher, or the writer. — not only to 
the students of the Conservatory — but to every one who knows him. 



IOO 



fotumt 



1913 



jfrosit %m 




ARGARET, did you hear the second buzz?" 

"What-t — se-cond buzz? Is it t-ime for it?" 
"Well, I should say so; it says 8:15 by our clock and that 



means no breakfast at all." 

"Oh, yes, it does, Julia — isn't it great that the town clock is fifteen 
minutes fast?" 

''Just luck ! I'm for a short dressing course and a boudoir cap. 
Guess we'll make the rolls and coffee anyway. That is a hearty 
breakfast for a working man but if Mr. Jordan so ordains w r hat are 
you going to do." 

"What did I hear you say about boudoir caps? Haven't you read 
the bulletin board this week? Mrs. Commodore has published an in- 
teresting item which says something about no breakfast for those 
wearing boudoir caps. Let's put on those chic little 98c hats and it 
will look as if we were starting out for an eight o'clock organ prac- 
tice hour." 

"Ready? Well, hurry up." 

We rush down stairs only to find the dining-room door closed — 
cruel fate! But a closed door has not much effect on us — when 
there is something behind it. So in we walk and take our places. 
There was one orange in sight and as "my wife" and I always go 
halves, it is all right. Mae greeted us with "too late." That was a 
blow so we had to chase upstairs again and try to cultivate our 
musical taste with a few scales. Just as I am getting interested (?), 
Clara arrives with her broom. I join the wait-for-the-mail brigade in 
the main (?) corridor. There is Claire reading "John's Day of Rest"; 
Hazel dreamily gazing at the "Foreign News"; Bessie Bn'ggs 
perusing the columns of Mildred Champagne ; and Margaret Wing 
absorbed in "The Banner Sale" in Jordan's basement. Clara is ready 
for Room 48 now so I must again start those scales. But Betty en- 
ters. "Oh Margaret! Play 'At the Devil's Ball?'" — and Margaret, a 
martyr to Remick Hits, tinkles off a little rag for Betty ; she departs 
well satisfied and I continue my practice. Alas ! It is impossible. 

"It's ten o'clock now room-mate and I have gotten in two hours 
of good practice. I have theory at eleven so I guess I had better be 
thinking about leaving. You know Professor will not tolerate tardi- 



W&t Btixme 



IOI 



ness — that is one word that is not in his vocabulary. Suppose he will 
inform me that the day of reckoning is at hand and ''the dead wood 
will be weeded out." 

I am half a minute late ! Horrors. This gave the Professor a 
good chance to use some of his pet phrases. "Why, why, you are 
very late, this is very important work that you have missed. I fear 
for you on April the 14th for, you know, we are to have a regular 
university examination. The music to be analyzed is sent from 
Europe especially for the exam. — that will decide one way or the 
other. Now I think that Miss Fair had better take you in hand and 
coach you up a bit." 

Nuf ced — you all know Professor. Bzz — lunch time at last ! What 
an appetite I have. But just gaze at this menu. 

JULIENNE BROTH 
(Compote of Fruit) 
HARD BOILED POTATOES (a la Frost) 
CHICKEN CROQUETTES (mystery sauce) 
ROAST BEEF CORNED BEEF 

HAM TONGUE 
! LEMON SHERBET ! 
CURRANT DROPS TEA SODA CRACKERS 

DATES (Sunday only) 

"Hello Mida." 

"Say, have you got a nickel? I've got a dollar bill but I don't 
dare ask anyone to change it." 

"Well, don't ask me for a nickel. I'm down to a postage stamp — in 
the line of cash. Broke, as usual. Sorry, Mida, keep on going — some 
one must have a nickel." 

Wish we didn't have to teach this afternoon. I think I'll put in 
a request for less work and more pay. But Mr. Porter says, "Do not 
let your work be guided by the compensation you receive for your 
services." 

After teaching, we rush home to a supper of roast beef (comme 
la shoe-leather) and a little brown bread for dessert. Then for a short 
dance on the third floor back. 

"Myra, you furnish the rag. Oh! Look at Maud Pike and Carrie 
Fernold doing the tango." Suzie is disgusted and Louise Moore soon 
puts a stop to it by "calling a taxi." 



102 



'CfK fttumt 



1913 



"There's Isabel in our room giving jsl demonstration (a la Proctor 
— biff! zipp! bang!) Get her out if you can." 

"All right. After she inspects everything in sight and asks a few 
( ?) questions — we will try to make her believe that she should be 
practicing." 

"Let's have Maud Briggs play 'Turkey in the Straw,' while Sara 
Helen accompanies her with a Liszt Rhapsodic Sara Helen likely 
won't do it for she would rather sit around and be Guyed!" 

Bzz ! Telephone for Julia Geary. 

"Now don't go and leave us like this Julia." 

''Girls. I hate to go but the men just won't let me alone." 
"Here comes Mildred Wright with some of her good fudge. You'll 
make a good partner. Mildred." 

"Hello. Esther, did you smell the fudge or did vou come in to 
have your keyboard harmony done or perchance you want to buv a 
postage stamp." 

"It's almost twelve girls. Go on to bed. Xo loud talking, re- 
member." 

I'm glad they went home early. I have to get some sleep so 
that I can get up early in the morning, for it is my practice hour from 
eight to nine." M. W. and J. C. 



19*3 



W$t iHtmnt 



103 



& Cfjromcle of tfje Houge of ^arbiter 

Chap. XI. 

1. Now there was in the city of Boston, in the south of it, a house 
called Gardner Hall. 

2. And it came to pass that in the ninth month, which is Septem- 
ber, there came to this house many young women ; yea even three 
score and ten. 

3. And when it was asked of these young women why they had 
come, for they were from many parts of the earth, they answered, some 
saying : 

4. We have come that we may learn to make music upon the piano- 
forte. 

5. And others answered, we have come that we may know how to 
make a loud noise with our voices. 

6. And yet others answered, we would know how to play upon the 
trumpet, cymbals and instruments of four strings. 

7. And so it came to pass that these young women abode together 
in this house and worked faithfully each day, some learning to make 
music upon the pianoforte, some learning to make a loud noise with 
their voices and still others learning to play the trumpet, cymbals and 
instruments of four strings. 

8. And there were sounds of much music in the house. 

9. And there was ruling over this house a woman, Adeline, sur- 
named Ferguson. 

10. And her rule was one of gentleness, and she spake kindly unto 
the young women. And she gave counsel unto them, lest they do that 
which was not expedient. 

11. Xow when fourteen days had passed which is two weeks, she 
called them together and spake unto them, saying : 

12. It is good that ye should know one another by your rightful 
names, and from what part of the earth ye are come. 

13. Therefore, at the setting of the sun, let us assemble in the 
brown room, which being interpreted, is the reception room, and re- 
ceive one another. 



io4 



<&f)t fitumt 



1913 



14. And there will be feasting and merry-making. 

15. And there was rejoicing among the young women. 

16. So it came to pass that at the seventh hour, when all that 
dwelt in the house had come together, they went about speaking their 
names one to another until all of the three score and ten were made 
known unto one another. 

17. And there was much merry-making and music and feasting un- 
til the tenth hour. 

18. And at the tenth hour each young woman lighted for herself a 
candle and went her way, saying, verily it is good to be here ! 

Chap. XII. 

1. And it came to pass in that same year, in the eleventh month, on 
the sixth day thereof, all the young women of the House of Gardner, 
each having with her a young man, met together in a hall. Recital Hall 
by name. 

2. And the young men and women were clad in their finest raiment, 
and they did make very merry. 

3. And there was music and much dancing, and feasting, until the 
twelfth hour. 

4. Xow from time to time there came to the House of Gardner, peo- 
ple from outside of the city. 

5. And there was one, Anne McClearv by name, who had dwelt in 
the house for seven years and at the end of that time had gone out 
into another city. 

6. And lo, she returned unto the city of Boston for a little while. 

7. Xow she remained at the House of Gardner for one day. 

8. And she was made welcome by all the young women and the 
ruler of the house. 

Q. Then was there a feast prepared for her in her honor, after which 
she made music upon the pianoforte, for all that were in the house. 

10. And they did praise her greatly. 

11. Even so did the days pass; yet there was not always merry- 
making. For even as the maiden loved pleasure so did they desire to 
excel in the work which they had chosen. 



12. And they labored faithfully that they might accomplish the 
tasks which were set before them. 

13. Yea. such was the wisdom and the goodly conduct of the 
young women that the ruler of the house was glad ; and all the women 
in the house were glad. 

14. So there was peace and happiness in the House of Gardner. 

Selah. C. L 




SAMUEL W. COLE 



1913 



107 



Samuel Winkley Cole was born at Meriden, N. H., in 1848. He 
began his professional career at Portsmouth, N. EL, in 1877; organist 
of the Clarendon Street Baptist church, Boston, 1882-1894; connected 
with the New England Conservatory since 1883 ; supervisor of music 
in the Brookline schools since 1884; instructor of public school 
methods in Boston University since 1906; produced Haydn's "Crea- 
tion" and Handel's "Messiah" with the Dedham High School in 1890- 
1891 which was probably the first successful atempt in the United 
States to produce a complete oratorio with High School pupils ; has 
been director of People's Singing Class movement and People's 
Choral Union in Boston; author of several books on Solfeggio, Sight- 
singing, etc. 

A singularly active life, of Mr. Cole, and a life brimful of shining 
accomplishments in a unique field, i. e. the musical education of the 
masses. The ''People's Choral Union" is but one of the many splen- 
did results of Mr. Cole's tireless energy and whole-hearted enthu- 
siasm. For thirty years he has given to the Conservatory the best 
that is in him. The students take this opportunity of expressing their 
appreciation of him — the man as well as the musician, — and their 
hope that he may remain long in the service of this institution. 



io8 



m3 



& JHes&age from Constantinople 

Greetings: I can imagine that at about this time the word "Neume" 
is being used more forcibly by your class presidents than heretofore. I 
am just as anxious, as though I were a member of your class, to see this 
year's production. Be sure to lay aside a copy for me, for even 
though thousands of miles from you, my interest in and my love 
for my Alma Mater is still very deep. 

I was very grieved to hear of Mr. Baermann's death. In his case 
the words of the poet are true — 

"To live in hearts we leave behind 
Is not to die." 

Doubtless you all have been too much absorbed in your work 
this w T inter to know that Turkey was trying to attract the world's at- 
tention by indulging in a family quarrel with her neighbors. To have 
lived through such a period and to have come through without being 
massacred was interesting, to say the least. 

Last fall we had several earthquakes : in November was the 
rumor of a wholesale massacre which was not very pleasant for the 
moment, then came war in earnest. The nearest fighting was at 
Tchtaldja, about thirty miles from here. We heard the cannon roar 
for two days from sun rise until late in the night. The next move 
was the revolution in the government and the murder of Xazim 
Pasha, commander-in-chief of the Turkish army. The "powers" have 
been very slow in coming to an agreement which pleases Turkey. So, 
while they, with the embassadors from these countries parley, war 
continues. 

Constantinople has maintained perfect order the entire time. The 
soldiers in passing through the city behaved well. Martial law was 
"on," and one could not be out after eleven o'clock, without a permit. 
On Xew Year's eve a crowd of us, returning from a party at the 
home of our American Consul. Mr. Ravandal. who lives near Robert 
College, were "held up," but after some time was spent in searching 
our limited vocabularies for a few words of broken Turkish we man- 
aged to make the guards understand we were from the American 
Mekteb (school), and we meant no harm in being out. After going 
on a few steps another guard rushed after us saying that we must 
carry a light — even though it was moonlight. Having had fore- 



1913 



109 



thought, we had taken a small lantern which the gentlemen proceeded 
to light. In several instances, people, some Americans, too. were 
taken to the police station for this offence. 

We often remarked that it would have been impossible to have 
had the order we enjoyed here in Boston or Xew York, had you had 
war only thirty miles away ! The wounded soldiers were brought by 
the thousands and women of all nationalities served making hospital 
supplies and offered their services as nurses. I went through two 
hospitals one day carrying flowers to the wounded. I did not care to 
go again. With the exception of three weeks, our schools have gone 
on as though war did not exist. 

A school of this kind is more interesting than vou can imagine. 
We have here girls of many nationalities — Turkish. Bulgarian, Per- 
sian. Armenian. Romanian. Russian. Greek. Jews, a few English and 
Americans. We have also an Arabic girl who is especially line look- 
ing and brilliant. These young ladies are not unlike our American 
girls in every particular — hobble skirts included. The Turkish girls 
never appear on the street without having on the "charshaf," but at 
school they are no different from any other in dress, looks and man- 
ners. 

English is the language of the college but every language is 
taught and spoken. The girls speak from three to seven languages 
each. We Americans are way behind when it comes to being lin- 
guists. Here, the atmosphere is full of it and a child picks up three 
languages without any effort. 

The city taken all in all is most fascinating, and this fascination 
grows on one. We have teachers who have been in this college for 
thirty vears and who could not be induced to return to America ex- 
cept for visits to their homes. You might wonder what we are able 
to do in a musical way here. The course of study is not unlike any 
school in America where piano and singing are the main subjects 
taught. We have six teachers in this department who give about 
two hundred lessons a week. Most of the girls are boarders whose 
homes are at a distance. They, of course, do all their practicing 
here and there is a continual reminder of those spacious practicing 
rooms in the basement of X. E. C. 

Music seems very difficult for the Turkish girls but it is no won- 
der when vou consider that their music is worse than the Chinese — 
no rhvthm whatever and no kev. 



no 



fitixme 



The Bulgarians, Greeks and Jews play very well. We have re- 
citals every month and you would be surprised to hear the girls play 
Bach Suites, Beethoven Sonatas, Grieg, Schubert and from other 
classic composers. 

I have given several musicales and played at a concert last fall, 
given by the piano teachers. We have very little chance of hearing 
good music. (I mean outside, of course), but I read "Musical 
America" and practice a little, trying to keep "in touch" with some 
of the good compositions. 

I hope to go to Germany as soon as school closes and have three 
months study with Godowski's former colleague. 

I was pleased to see in "Musical America" of the gift X. E. C. 
had received. I only wish she could receive many more. How is 
our dear Mr. Chadwick? To see his name among the honored in the 
list of the members of The Rational Art Association made me again 
realize what a great man he is and has been. 

Very sincerely, 

Sara B. Taylor, 'ii. 



1913 ^6* j^eunu 



1 1 1 




etutortals; 



At the present hour there is more widespread interest being mani- 
fested in music in America than there has ever been before. It is evi- 
denced bv the yearly increase of students at 

A MESSAGE FROM . - - - . , . ., 

Colorado musical schools, b}' the springing up 01 multitudi- 

nous schools of music in the smaller cities, by the 
institution of symphony orchestras in these smaller cities, by a wider 
presentation of opera than heretofore. For instance, in Boston and 
Chicago, opera is today an established fact, while but a very few year? 
ago these cities depended on the caprice of the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany for a short two weeks of opera, while the small cities eagerly await 
their occasional visit of opera, and greet with open arms a few nights of 
this coveted enjoyment when they can seize the opera companies on tour. 

Then last but not least of this manifest interest in music is the 
growth of the musical club, which in the National Musical Federation 
has become a national institution. These organizations exist in thousands 
till there is scarcely a town of any importance without its musical club. 
By furnishing instruction for the musically untutored as well as by 
stimulating the general interest in the community's musical advance- 
ment, these clubs fill a great need and constitute an extremely important 
factor in the country's musical growth. 

Thus this musical awakening in America, this wave of desire for 
closer intimacy with the best music is being widely felt, and is perhaps 
nowhere exhibited more strongly than in what used to be called the 
"wild and woolly West." Here the demand for a better grade of musical 
instruction is seemingly far greater than the supply. 

Since there is this musical awakening throughout the country, a 
grave responsibility rests upon the musically educated, a responsibility 



112 



"Cfjt fitumt 



1913 



like that which was felt by Theodore Thomas in the musical pioneer days 
of the country, and later by MacDowell. specifically different but similar 
in aim. They never sacrificed their ideals to satisfy the public, but 
sought ever to bring the standard of musical appreciation up to their 
ideals. Such is the feeling which should exist among composers, artists, 
teachers — all musicians, however humble. 

It has been recognized, then, that the popular musical interest of 
today is directed toward a higher class of music than in earlier years ; 
but exclusive of artists and the larger musical organizations we know 
that the execution of this higher class of music is often very crude, even 
sometimes by so-called "advanced students." The field for greater 
improvement appears to lie in more artistic execution and a cultivation 
of a finer musical perception. 

Let the aim be a higher artistic execution of the smallest composi- 
tion, rather than a merely correct but musically indifferent execution of 
larger and more difficult works ; and to help to arouse in the public of 
this country — as has long been the case in some of the countries of 
Europe — a more intelligent appreciation of music as an art. 

91 

It is often said of musicians that as a class they are the most jealous 
people in the world. Perhaps this is true, but if so, surely it is a serious 

condition of affairs. 
jealousy. Music is based on harmony, and jealousy is 

one of the worst forms of mental inharmony, 
and as such, must be injurious to a musician's best creative or inter- 
spective powers. 

Musicians should work for the betterment of their art, not for per- 
sonal glory or financial success. As we leave our Alma Mater and go 
into different parts of the world, let us strive not for our own advance- 
ment but for the betterment of musical conditions. Let the world say 
that we are generous and helpful to each other, and that we are as 
beautiful and uplifting in character as the art we serve. 



There is, perhaps, no subject that has been so bantered over, so 
widely discussed — as that of "concentration." The students may sigh 

at reading about it, but probably our teachers 
concentration. will not consider a word concerning it amiss in 

this volume. 

In order to do one's best work, in any line of study, it is first of all 



1913 



^fje iReume 



113 



necessary that the whole of one's mental forces be brought into play and 
that one's entire attention be centered upon the task to be accomplished. 
The average music student can spend such a very short time in sur- 
roundings conducive to the rapid development of his art that surely it 
behooves him to recognize and apply at all times the important prin- 
ciple O'f concentration. 

How easy it is to go to classes and sit and dream while the pains- 
taking teacher endeavors to guide you into further channels of knowl- 
edge only to find that his efforts have been nearly all wasted. And even 
less difficult it is to let one's mind wander over all sorts of subjects other 
than music when one is practicing. But where is the teacher who is not 
gratified when he finds an alert, responsive pupil, whose keen interest in 
his work shows a mind which concentrates? And certainly, a good stu- 
dent knows the value of concentration in practice and benefits accord- 
ingly. 

There is certainly no reason why we students should not "pull our- 
selves together" and strive to profit by this invaluable force, which is 
not only a time saver, but a power in mental development, in artistic 
growth and a prime factor in everything that makes for human progress 
and achievement. 

A 

One of the most far-reaching branches of the Conservatory in direct 
results and invaluable experience is the Normal Department. 

The normal courses are given in Pianoforte, 

THE NORMAL T7 . 1 tt- i- 1 r 

department V oice and Violin, and cover a space 01 two or 

more years. They are arranged to give the stu- 
dents an opportunity for practical experience in teachnng under careful 
criticism and supervision. 

A certain grade of advancement is required for entrance to the 
Normal. The theoretical knowledge necessary is acquired through 
courses of lectures and teachers' meetings, and the practical side is de- 
veloped by demonstrative work given collectively and individually. 

The lectures treat of the "Art of Teaching" as applied to the various 
departments, and the teachers' meetings give opportunity for discussion 
and criticism of the work done in classes with the other student teachers 
and with the Superintendent of the department. Actual experience is 
gained through teaching classes of young pupils and this teaching is all 
done under the supervision of the Superintendent. Public and private 
demonstrations are prepared as called for by the head of the department. 



1913 



So the aim of normal work is first to establish the ability to know- 
one's self ; and secondly, that most important factor in teaching, the 
clear understanding of the mental as well as the physical needs of the 
pupil. 

Thus equipped, the New England Conservatory Xormal Depart- 
ment graduates find themselves thoroughly prepared to meet the require- 
ments of the present day ; and they are constantly in demand in all parts 
of the country. 

In reaching for success in anv pursuit where one is brought into 
frequent, close contact with his or her fellow beings, personality is an 

important factor for consideration and cultivation. 

personality. It is more important, of course, in the case 

of the singer than in that of the instrumentalist, 
because the latter has the medium of the instrument through which to 
give expression, whereas the singer has only the medium of the voice. 
And the voice is a part of the person. 

Personality may either repel or attract, or being of a mental nature, 
do neither. A vocalist with a disagreeable personality may sing with 
much skill and yet not please her audience, whereas, the singer with an 
agreeable presence and an attractive nature, possessing no more skill 
than the others, will awaken enthusiasm and win salvos of applause. An 
attractive personality is largely, but not wholly a natural gift. It can 
be attained through study and effort, cultivated like a flowering plant. 

Put the noblest there is in you into your art. put your whole heart 
into it. Feel the keenest enthusiasm for it. and your enthusiasm will 
be communicated to your audience. There will come that forgetfulness 
of self that gives natural poise to the performer, the grace and charm 
that wins the heart. Love and enthusiasm for your work will create in 
you a certain subtle vivacity, and those who watch you will name it per- 
sonal magnetism. 

Then give to your work the utmost of vour intelligence, cultivate 
love and sympathy for all mankind until you are able to touch the 
chords that bind mankind into one common humanity. In that way you 
will cause each individual of your audience to feel that you have per- 
formed to him or her alone. And each will say — when vou have finished. 
"What a wonderful personality! How beautiful! Hew sincere! What 
magnetism !" 



i9 J 3 



"Ctjt fltumc 



"Oh, I don't care to go to Jordan Hall tonight: it's only an Organ 
Recital, and they are such bores," is the expression you so often hear 

from students, if they do not nappen to study 

A PLEA FOR „ , XT : .. . ... , , 

"foreign instruments." Organ. But the \ lohmst will always take 

the opportunity to hear a Violinist, the 
Pianist, a Pianist, etc. It seems to be a fixed notion with the students 
(especially the new ones J that they can only profit by hearing their own 
instrument performed upon. 

Take for instance a Piano Recital given by one of the Faculty in 
Jordan Hall, where no admission is charged, you will find that out of 
every ten students present, nine of them are Pianists. It is the same 
with all the others ; 'Cello students care only to hear 'Cellists : Vocalists 
care to hear Opera and not Symphony concerts ( unless the soloist is a 
singer. 

If it were announced that the world's premier oboist were to give 
a Recital in Jordan Hall at a small admission charge, or even with no 
charge at all to students, we may safely conclude that his audience would 
bear ridiculous comparison in point of numbers to that of a Pianist or 
Vocalist of only mediocre ability. The oboist would number among his 
audience a great majority of students of that instrument, with a sprink- 
ling of Flutists, Clarinetists and other wind instrumentalists. A few 
composition students would probably be in attendance, but by no stretch 
of our imagination can we conceive of a large number of Pianists, Vocal- 
ists or string players being present. 

Yet after M. Longy had fini-hed his Oboe solo, in one of the 
Longv Club Concerts, no Pianist or Vocalist ever received more hearty 
and earnest applause than did this sterling musician. Many people 
nresent heard, for the first time how beautiful this instrument could 
sound instead of being "reedy," and penetrative, as is often the ca-e. 

It is unfortunate to observe the ignorance on the part of a great 
majority of students of the very names of important orchestral instru- 
ments. It is not unusual to meet with many who do not know the dis- 
tinguishing characteristics of a Bassoon and a French Horn. 

Do these students ever hope to become intelligent listeners, we will 
not say intelligent critics, of orchestral music? One might show sym- 
pathy for them, were a great intellectual effort on their part necessary 
to acquire the knowledge of the resources, colors and peculiar qualities 
of these foreign instruments. 

But an acquaintance with and appreciation of the^e instruments 
mav be had with only a little effort on their part by intelligent observa- 



n6 



1913 



tion at divers concerts, careful reading of books on the subjects, infor- 
mation easily received from the performers themselves . etc., and the 
result would be beyond all proportion as compared with the expenditure 
of time and energy necessary to attain it. 

i 



The Conservatory has recently received a generous gift — of Sioo.- 
000.00 — from an anonymous contributor. Heretofore the music schools 

of this countrv have often been strangelv neglect- 

A GIFT TO THE , • , r r 1 r 1 

coxserv\tory. e< l in tne mat -er of tunds tor endowment, support 

and expansion, while other schools have been gen- 
erously supplied for all foreseen (and unforeseen) exigencies. Xow 
it seems that the tide is turning and that the music schoois are beginning 
to win well-deserved recognition for their work. May this generous 
gift to our beloved school act as a stimulus, an incentive, an example for 
the wealthy art patrons in America to emulate. 



6 k 6 



I 9 I 3 



»7 





cntor flams' 



She — Why do von always bring me to a restaurant where there's 
hardly a soul to be seen? 

He — My dear child, don't you know? I am preparing to give a 
piano recital and must therefore get accustomed to seeing empty places. 



The Proctor twins : 

Blanche Brocklejohn 
Sara Helen Littlebank. 



There are me'tres of accent. 
There are metres of tone. 

But the best of all metres 
Is to meet her alone. 



( True one — Xormal pupil said it) : 
Teacher — What does "f" mean? 
Pupil — Forte ! 

Teacher — Then what does "mf" mean? 
Pupil — Twenty. 



The young colored boy (after gazing long and hard at the slide 
trombone player of the band^ — Missa' Chase. I don' see how you play 
dat 'er trombone: it ain't got no triggers on it !" 



n8 



1913 



The minister ( at church entertainment after 23 piano solos, nine 
vocal selections, besides a diversity of other "noises") — And now. friends, 
to close our programme the choir will render Bachoven's "Hymn of 
Thanksgiving." after which Miss Screechem will sing "All Thro' the 
Night." 



Poppy — Lou Adolph — rich and gorgeous but just a little dreamy 
like her name flower. 

Svringa — Hazel Barbiers — used in bridal wreaths and bouquets ; 
very attractive. 

Daffodil — Helen Fair — tall and straight and brilliant ; the very 
essence of springtime and brightness: one always wants a roomful of 
these lovely flowers. 

Sweet William — Howard Goding. 

Garden Moss — Guy S. Maier — extremely thrifty ; needs frequent 
and severe pruning. 

Chrysanthemum — Mima Montgomery — stately and regal. 

Pansy — Ella Xord — a quiet little blossom whose face is so interest- 
ing and piquant you can't pass it by without stopping. 

Zinnia — Claire Oakes — a bright lovely flower which stands out from 
those around it and which brightens its surroundings. 

Buttercup — Clara Whipple — a bright cheery flower that reflects the 
sun on a bright day and gathers all the stray sunbeams when the day is 
cloudy. 

Fuschia — Alice Whitehouse — modest and drooping. 
Jasmine — Elizabeth Wood — a star among flowers ; very effective 
artistically. 

Pond Lily — Sara Helen Littlejohn — delicate in appearance, but capa- 
ble of standing a great deal. Thrives in mires and all marshy places. 



NEUME BOARD FLOWERS. 




ALL THE LATEST RAGS 




A TRIO 



120 



'Cfjr fttixmt 



1913 



NURSERY RHYMES FOR JUNIORS ONLY. 

At Room 13. 

A dillar, a dollar, a nine-seven scholar, 
W hat makes you come so late? 

Theory class, my lad and lass, 
Cannot for laggards wait. 

At a Saturday Recital. 

Oh where, oh where have those little notes gone 
Oh where, oh where can they be ? 

I had them tucked 'way in my memory, say. 
Oh where, oh where can they be? 

At the Senior Entrance Exams. 

A young junior so keen went up to the Dear, 

To find what his mark might be. 
But when he got there he sank in despair. 

For he found he had Bunked with an "E." 



"Hazel, look at that tablet in memory of Xoah Webster." 

"Is it really? Well, I always wondered what his last name was." 



Miss Whitehouse (to the editor after his ardent pleas for jokes and 
grinds) — Oh, did you want something FUXXY? 



1913 



'Cfjr ficumt 



121 



CONSERVATOCKY. 

'Twas ludwig and de voto johns 

Did hunt and zcemple in dennce. 
All stickney were the flandcrs white 

And the brooke briggs-stanaz^ay. 

Beware the wint emits, mason .' 
The deans that mahr, the s/jaw henay; 
Beware the hackebarth and shun 
The grucnberg thurzcanger ! 

He took his good rich sword in hand, 
Lincoln the shirley toe he sought : 

Then rofo/z by the lenom tree 
And stasny while in thought. 

Andrews in t'ofe fr/ar£ thought he stood, 
The zcin tern itz with nYr of flame 

Came alien through the humph rex wood 
J^an zcieren as it came. 

One, two ! One. two ! and through and through 
The munger blade went snicker-snaek ! 

He bennett dead, and with its head 
He adamozcski'd back. 

And faust thou peirce{d) the winternitz? 

Conti my arms, my bemis boy! 
O chadzcick day! Tyler, tourjce! 

He blanchart in his joy. 

'Twas ludwig and cte voto johns 

Did Altai and zcemple in dennce. 
All stickney were the tlanders white 

And the brooke briggs-stanazcay. 



Copy catted by M. A. T. and J. T. D. 



122 



ZLty jHeumt 



1913 



AT THE MASON AND HAMLIN CONTEST. 

Ten little seniors, sitting in a line, 

One left to play his piece, then there were nine. 

Nine little seniors, oh, the dreadful wait! 

One came back a nervous wreck, then there were eight. 

Eight little seniors, praying aid from heaven, 

One tripped down the "broad highway," then there were seven. 

Seven little seniors, "Oh, my hands feel just like sticks, 

And my knees, my knees !" she left them, then there were six. 

Six little seniors, the call came for two more, 

They went marching bravely, then there were four. 

Four little seniors, one forgot the key 

In which she was to start her piece ; then there were three. 

Three little seniors looking rather blue, 

One fled for happier lands, then there were two. 

Two little seniors, "Oh, I know Til miss that run. 

And is my tram all right?'' Then there was one. 

One little senior, waiting to go on. 

Ready to do his best, but the audience had gone ! 



Miss B. — Oh, how I enjoy Guy's playing! He has so much tem- 
perature ! 



Emmie — Why don't they have finger bowls in this place? 

Lydia — Tell you what they could do. Some of these people around 
here have a lot of brass, and why not get some of the knockers to ham- 
mer us some finger bowls? 



Scott — Do you live in Maine or somewhere? 
Agnes — I don't live in Maine but I live somewhere. 



1913 



123 



A SENIOR ALPHABET. 

A is for Adolph — the first A on the list ; 

B is for Barbiers who hates to be kissed. 

C is for Crosby, so shy and demure, 

D is for Derrick — you know him, I'm sure. 

E is for Eldridge, of stature quite tall, 

F is for Fair, who is liked by all. 

G is for Goding — one of the few, 

H is for Hyde w!k> knows just what to do ( ?). 

I is for Ingham — always something to say; 

J is for Jordan, who certainly can play. 

K is for Kent with a smile for all, 

L is for Lucas who allows men to call. 

M's for Montgomery who fell thru the ice, 

N is for Neekamp — known to laugh once or twice. 

O is for Oakes, the girl with red hair, 

P is for Powell who — no, that's not fair. 

Q is for Quinn who follows the fashion, 

R is for Russell who used to take cash in. 

S is for Swisher, she's engaged, I am told ; 

T is for Tierney — they say he's quite old. 

U is for us, the people who wrote this ; 

V's for the verse that may be amiss. 

W — they're too many to name only one ; 

X is for those who didn't get "done." 

Y is for Young who loves to drink tea, 

But there isn't a name beginning with Z. 



124 



0t\xmt 



1913 



We surely have the finest cook, 
I guess he cooks without a book. 
Originality ! that's his name, 
With his desserts he's won his fame, 
Indian pudding, oh, what bliss ! 
Without it, what a lot we'd miss. 
Vegetable hash of a brilliant hue, 
Of how it's made there's ne'er a clue 
Blessings on thee, chef of ours, 
May thy days be filled with flours, 
Far o'er the world we'll wander yet, 
But oh, those meals we'll ne'er forget. 




A RESOLUTION IN HARMONY 



1913 fttumt 125 

SINFONIA NURSERY RHYMES. 

With apologies to Mother Goose. 

Little Jack Snyder 

Sat in a corner 

Looking so glum one day ; 

Quoth Jack, 

" 'Tis a fact 
that 

There're pretty girls here. 
And there're pretty girls there. 
But mine have all ^one awav." 

Hey, diddle, diddle. 
"Rol" plays his fiddle : 
The neighbors all growl, 
And the dogs they all howl — 
Can you blame them ? 



126 



'Cfir fltumt 



1913 



Theodore Gundry 
Graduated on Monday. 
Collected bills on Tuesday, 
Still collecting on W ednesday, 
More bills on Thursday. 
Worse on Friday. 
Died on Saturday. 
Buried on Sunday. 
Poor Teddy Gundry ! 

Little boy Brown, come show us your charms, 
We are all jealous, all up in arms, 
You always secure the very best dame. 
Whether she be Ann Eliza or Jane. 

We couldn't print our "Mother Goose" verse for '"Keezy." It 
wouldn't look good in print. However, here are the rhymes : 
"'Keezy, Little Bo-Peepsie. teasie, squeezv." etc.. etc. 

Blanche and '"Chet" went out to ride 
Together, sitting side by side. 

A tire burst, 

Chet fell out first. 
And Blanche came tumbling after, 
With a heigho. etc.. etc.. etc. 

Old brother Frank was a jolly old soul, 

And a jolly old soul was he. 
He called for his pipe and he called for his bowl 

Cntil called bv Adamowski ! 

(And then well, never mind!) 

"•Patty." "Patty" (yes quite •'"batty"), 

"What makes you go so slow?" 
"Experience wide, and much else beside, 

Has made me so. v'know." 



IQI 



'cfjr Mtumt 



12' 




A '"Cubist" picture in the Neume at last! Here it i^ ! Title. "Sweet 
Twilight Reverie." It has recently inspired M. Destraussy to the 
writing" of a tone-poem. The music is Prestississimo and Sforzandis- 
sissimo throughout. 



128 



'Cjjr j^rumr 



1913 




INSPIRATION 



RECENT FASHIONS IN PROVERBS. 

A Good Dame is Rather to be Chosen than Great Riches." 
'*Go to the Sluggard thou Ant : Consider his Ways and be Wise." 
"A Joy-ride goeth Before Destruction and a Sporty Spirit Before 
a Fall. - ' ' 

"Tall Aches from Little Toe-corns Grow." 
There's many a slip 'twixt Lip and Lip. 
As you Owe. so shall you Weep. 

Better Never than Late (For Mr. Elson's Classes). 

A Penny Earned is Seldom a Penny Saved. 

After Dinner Loaf Awhile — after Supper Loaf some more. 

Love, and let Love ! 

Do Unto Others as they Would do Unto You — if They Had the 
Same Chance. 

To Yearn is Human ; to take vour Medicine, Divine. 



i9 l 3 



129 



i?. £ C. Cennts Sssoctation 



On May 6, the first meeting of the association was held, at which 
the following officers were elected : 



The annual tournament makes spirit run high among the girls resid- 
ing in the dormitories. Each hall is represented in both the singles and 
doubles and the winners are awarded cups and racquets, according to 
place. The contestants for this year's tournament on June 3, 4. 5 and 6, 
will probably be Anne Baker for Gardiner, Bertha Grave: for Dana, and 
Helen Fair for Frost. 



Claire G. Oakes 
Clara Ingham . 
loretta curley 



President 



Secretary 



1 reasitrer 



1 3° 



191 



The Ensemble Menagerie by one of the Beasts with apologies for 
the omission of the wild-cat. gorilla, hippopotamus, scrambled egg. 
asparagus-on-toast, turtle-dove, lizard. Swis<-cheese. grasshopper, etc.. 
etc.. etc. 



! 3 2 



'Ctjr fiteumc 



1913 



Name. 


Worst Fault. 


Favorite Stunt 


In 1983. 


ADOLPH 


Accuracy 


Talking to Mr. Ensemble 


An advocate of the new 
theory (single blessedness) 


BARBIERS 


Dress 


Writing to Europe 


Founder of a new Religion 


BENSON 


Society 


Making trousseau 


Married (we hope) 


BISHOP 


Argumentation 


Hard work 


Debator 


BREWER 


Making- eyes 


Engaged 


I Signified matron 


BURR ILL 


Kmbroidering 


Harmonizing colors 


Happy matron 


COOPER 


Meekness 


Playing in Ensemble 


A second Caruso 


CROSBY 


Theater habit 


Eating chocolate 


Diplomat 


DAM< >N 


Careful speech 


Dancing 


Settlement worker 


DERRICK 


Smiling 


Florid speech 


Knight errant 


DOLLOFF 


Attendance at Ensemble 


Smiling 


Head of private kindergartet 


PAIR 


Holding offices 


Dancing 


Pres. of Woman's Club 


GILLIATT 


Jollity 


Gayety 


Humorist 


GRAY 


Playing in Ensemble 


He-he! 


More he-he ! 


GOODSPEED 


Talking 


Asking questions 


Teacher of system 


HINCKLEY 


Fussing 


Playing in Recital 


Milliner 


HUNT 


Talking (?) 


Silence 


Walking with H. Whiting 


HYDE 


Dictating 


Solfeggio 


Suffragette 


INGHAM 


Appetite 


Spending money 


Society leader 


JORDAN- 


Hustling 


Playing contrapuntal 
compositions 


Authority on counterpoint 


KENT 


Silence 


Teaching General Class 


Suffragette 


LAKE 


1 ' c t i ci u < r 

M. 1 ( 1 V_ II' All — . 


s,tud> ing niusii 




LANE 


Primping 


Making hats 


Still primping 


LINCOLN 


Conscientitmsness 


Teaching Sunday School 


Missionary 


LITTLE JOHN 


Sewing- 


Forgetting 


Female Paderewski 


LUND 


Giggling 


Cnopping Balsam 


Still looking for "that 
lost cnoj <i 


MAIER 


Relaxation 


Playing "Music 
With My Meals" 


urOuUWSKl 11. 


A 1 T"'P'r T-"" 1 » 


OCW lllg 


Hurrying 


De Voto II. 


iS \J Xv U 


1 ^ < > / . 1 - 1 j 1 ^ 1 1 ■ i l' ^ 
XV ei. Klt^>>lir^>> 


Disturbing the peace 


Preceptress ot Dana Hall 




*J I ^ I j 


Iniatiating Sinfonians 


"\I-iil*imi-» FP ' S 
luaUcl 1 1 1 v V i<uir 

Beauty Parlors" 


POWELL 


A rgufyin' 


Playing solitaire 


Teaching 


RUSSELL 


Class spirit 


Supporting two 


Supporting more 


SNOW 


Preciseness 




Teaching 


STANLEY 


Tech shows 


Playing Debussy 


Famous artist 


SWISHER 


Modesty 


Motoring 


Keeping house 


TAG EN 


Accompanying violinists 


Asking questions 


Head of a Normal Dept. 


WADDELL 


Criticising 


Arguing 


Critic on Boston American 


WHEELER 


Love for Bull Dogs 


Clogging in wooden 
shoes 


Limsterdam 



19 1 3 



Tlfjt flmnxt 



Name 


Worst Fault 


Favorite Stunt 


In 1923 




Sr inlying' 


Working 


Still studying 


JbOlooiiiAl 


English diction 


Movies 


Still going 


G E R B 


Fidget ing 


Making fudge 


stump speaker 


L I CAS 


s,-i ssing German 
Prof. 


Hurrying Exits 


Bo win' 


A T 1 k V TP ( \ A I 7." 1 > V 


Breaking the ice 


Strolling in Fenway 


She'd like to know 


NEEKAMP 


Study of medicine 


Laughing 


Coon shouter 


QUINN 


Masculinity 


Turkey trotting 


Light opera star 


SIZE 


Acting 




Editor of Life 


S L'OFFORD 


Fickleness 




still tickle 


WHIPPLE 


Knowin' everybody 


Being with "Billy" 


German grammarian 


WOOD 


Sporting 


Fussing 


Driving a Mitchell 


ASHLEY 


Walk 


\Y< aring good-looking 
clothes 


Professional Organ Tuner 


CHAP IN 






i » » f 


GODING 


Chewing gum 


Hunting Neume adds. 


Same thing 


NICKLES 


Reticence 


Walking quietly 


An exponent of Mr. 
Gilbert's theory 


IU >BINSON 


Attending class 
meetings 


Riding towards 
Worcester 


Teaching 


WILKINS 


Love for automobiles 


Cooking chafing dish 
suppers on a stove 


Coach of B. A. A. Hockey 
Team 


MATTHEWS 


"Fussing" 


Flaying ragtime 


With the "Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra" 


DE LASCIA 


The ladies 


Roller skating 


Ask "Fletcher" 


MAINENTE 


Playing flute 


Composition 


Director of the Conservatory 
at ( ?) Texas 



134 



1913 



A Conservatory, my dear, is not a place where they raise Mowers. 
That is, not necessarily. Of course, you can raise flowers in a conserva- 
tory, but isn't it vastly more interesting to raise Art? Agatha, I am 
shocked ! To think that you should indulge in that vulgar attempt at 
humor! "Raise the roof' as far as you have been able to hear! Indeed! 
I fear that you will never rise to a true conception of the beauty, of the 
grandeur of Art. Art for art's sake — how artless ! To interpret all life's 
emotions, passions, moods, to lose yourself in the thrill of a masterpiece, 
to forget that you are you, to know only the charm of the music and to 
follow where it leads — that is the reward of the Gods. 

They DON'T "squeal," at least, none except the new ones, and the 
players do not make noises like a cross between a German band and a 
lively cat fight, — with an L train thrown in now and then ! 

Can you expect the potters' clay to be changed instantly into the 
perfect vase? Xonsense ! It takes time and effort and brains — hear me? 
Brains!! It is a crude lump which is first put on the wheel, but the 
projections are smoothed, the clay made symmetrical, graceful, beautiful, 
and lo ! it is finished. Well, suppose the vase is broken by the servant 

girl ; lias it not allured someone by its beauty, has it not Jim says — 

"What?" He'd hate to be an angel and never do a thing but practice on 
a darned old harp and sing and sing and sing? 

Well, I never ! 




"SOME WILD YOUNG THING TO KISS BEHIND THE DOOR" 




g>totft ^tcfes for funtors 

Junior — What is music? 

Ror.ERTA Kennard — At the dormitories it's organized noise." 



"No, Fisher, a three division song form is not a club sandwich. 



Yoii don't have to "Hunt" for Gladys; just go to Potter Hall. 



Senior — Can you tell me who those two Juniors arc"" 
Junior — Yes — that's Yogel "Ann Eliza." 



The latest nickname for the Con. is "Preservatory," because it is full 
<jf peaches — and incidentally — a few "pairs." 



DRUG STORE GOSSIP 

Mr. O. — Have you ever seen that girl before? 
Junior — Yes, often. 

Mr. Q. — Have you ever noticed anything funny about her? 
Junior — Why, yes, come to think of it, T have seen you with her 
once or twice. 



*9*3 



'Cfjc &tumt 



Overheard in First Session Harmony Class: 

Little Cox. Boy — I have some tickets for the theatre tonight. 

Little Cox. Girl — Oh, have yon? Let me see them. 

Proudly he pulled them out of his pocket and showed them to her. 

"Parquet!" she exclaimed. 

"Parquet? Is that a good show?" 



W iggle, wiggle, little hnger. 

How I wonder why you linger. 

L'p above the keys so high. 

W hen you should just make them fly. 



Mr. Dexxle (angrily) — See. I can write my name in the dust on 
this piano. 

Junior (admiringly) — Sure, there's nothing like eddication, after 
all, is there. Sir?" 



BEAUTY NOTES. 

Even the prettiest nose looks bad in other people s business. 

Trampling on other people's feelings is the worst thing possible for 
the feet. 

Hard lines about the mouth can frequently be removed by the rea- 
sonable use of a smile. 

Eyes can be brightened effectively by looking on the pleasant side 
of life' 



Which would you rather have on hand, 

A grand baby or a baby grand? 

A grand baby often screams and hollers. 

While a baby grand cost- eight hundred dollars. 



flnmxt 



MELLOW DRAMMER. 

Scene — Recital Hall. 
Time — After Mr. Elson's lecture. 
( )ccasion — A Sinforria initiate n. 
Characters — Damsky, clarinetist; Fischer, flutist. 
Necessary Properties — Mr. Frank Russell, a flute, a clarinet, an 
audience. 

Introduction — Scene opens with much noise in foreground. 
Plot thickens. 

Damsky (blozving an ear-splitting blast on his clarinet) — This, 
ladies, typifies melancholy. 

Fischer is seen hut not heard. 

Crescendo — More noise. Duet for flute and clarinet in various 
keys (a la ScJwenberg) . 

Diminuendo — Large and fluent vocahulary on the part of Fischer. 
Gurgle from Damsky. 

Finale — Russell with Hook! 



NOTICE. 

The Net me Committee 

respectfully requests the kind contributor who handed us the following 
"joke," to draw a diagram showing the location of the point : 

"The ensemble was very effective and we saw the band play." 



'Cfjc jl>cumc 



i39 



JUNIOR "WANT" COLUMN. 

W anted by Lyle Trusselle — A minister. 

By Gladys Hunt — A little class spirit. 

By Hester Deasey — Someone to keep step with me. 

By Dorothy Willis — Breakfast at eleven. 

By Maude Beaudrey — A ragtime "Pianola." 

By Laura Yenable — Someone to call me "cutey." 

By Gerhard Ringgenberg — Someone to pronounce my name. 

By Edna Klar — Suit of gentleman's clothes. 

By Marjorie Gaskins — A window alphabet. 

By Mary Xoyes — Someone to make a "fuss" over me. 

By Evelyn Gander — A sense of humor. 

By Adolf Yogel — A home in "Utah" ( furnished accordingly). 

By The Cotton Twins — A mark of distinction. 

By Marion Feeley — A "twelve hour" dance. 

By Lane Frisby — An elevator in Gardiner. 

By Dorothy Hills — Someone to skate with. 

By Roberta Kennard — An automatic "light extinguisher." 

By Beatrice Ragsdale's neighbors — A little rest between times. 

By Grace McCoy — Introduction to the "Junior Glass." 

By Agnes Gottschalk — A maid. 

By Loretta Curley — A pair of "curling irons." 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



N^w Fyngland 

Conservatory 

of MUSIC 

GEORGE W. CHADXTICK. Director 

THE SCHOOL YEA% 

1913-14 

"BEGINS SEPTEMBER ISth 




particulars and year beck acc-cs; 

RALPH L. FLANDERS, -rttzruiger 
HUNTINGTON AVENUE BOSTON, SHASS. 



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A MANUAL FOR THE TEACHER AND 
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Elson's Music Dictionary 

BY LOUIS C. ELSON 

'Professor of theory of JlSCusic at the 2V"eir England 
Conservatory of 3&usic 

Includes every necessary word used in music 
with its pronunciation. A list of prominent 
foreign composers and artists with their chief 
works, the pronunciation of their names and 
the date of their births, etc. A short vocab- 
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Italian equivalents. 

Price, Cloth, Postpaid, $1.00 

Elson's Pocket Music Dictionary 

Price, Cloth, Postpaid, 35c. 



Biographical Dictionary 
of Musicians 

BY W. J. BALTZELL 

An invaluable Handy Reference Work for 
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latest, most concise, yet comprehensive hand- 
book of music biography published. 

Price, Postpaid, $1.25 

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IV/I T TQIf^I A M A ma § azme f° r tne teacher, the student, and the lover 
I JTIEj IVIUOIV^IMTN of music. Subscription price, One Year $1.50 



OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

150 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS- 



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PUTNAM'S 

Nearly opp. Boston Opera House Opp. New England Conservatory of Music 

282-286 Huntington Avenue Corner Gainsboro Street 



EIGHTY FURNISHED ROOMS SPECIAL RATES TO PERMANENT PARTIES 



Special Opera Dinner, 5 P. M. until 


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and Fancy Ices. 






i udi vyy/cc l cLcgrupn \JjjlC6 


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DRUGS, SODA AXD CIGARS, 


Fresh Eggs, Milk, Butter and Veg- 
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Manicure Goods and Toilet Articles 
Periodicals and Stationery 


Sold at the Counter 






Prescriptions a Specialty 


CATERING A SPECIALTY 


Registered Pharmacists in Attendance 


FOR 




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CONSERVATORY 


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DRUG STORE (Putnam's Pharmacy) 


282 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 


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F. H. PUTNAM 

TELEPHONE BACK BAY 177 



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For Sevent/YearsEverx 

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Has Been ButltAs Though 

There inDepended The 
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ChostfStieff 



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The Mercantile Heart of New England 



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Admittedly the finest piano 
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■ =i 

ESTABLISHED 1854 



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492 BOYLSTON ST. 



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21 % Jf ettmg 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Greek Letter Fraternity 

JEWELRY 

213 N. Liberty St., BALTIMORE, MD. 

FACTORY 

212 LITTLE SHARP ST. 

Memorandum package sent to any fraternity member 
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Special designs and estimates furnished, on medals, 
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COMMONWEALTH PRESS 

Hrt (printers 



WORCESTER : MASSACHUSETTS 



ESTABLISHED 1848 

IBall & Cole 

FRUIT PRODUCE 

100 Faneuil Hall Market 102 
BOSTON, MASS. 

STACY L. HALL "References BEACON T3UST CO. 



BOOTS, SHOES 

and RUBBERS 

"For the College Girl 99 

SPECIAL MANNISH STYLE OXFORDS for Spring 1913 



PARTY SLIPPER S 
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2.50 

Hosiery to match 

1.00 

TENNIS & GYM 
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The CUSTOM BOOT SHOP 

184 Massachusetts Ave., BOSTON, MASS. 



TELEPHONE OXFORD 882 J. 



M. MAZER 

Ladies' Tailor 



19 Temple Place, Boston, Mass. 






3oyiSTOAf ST. 



J30STON 



BRUNSWICK HOTEL BLOCK 

10 Per Cent Discount 

to Conservatory Students 



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Social 
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Is our Specialty 

Call or send for samples 

WARD'S 

57-63 FRANKLIN STREET 
BOSTON 


MILLINERY 

Ladies' and Qents' 
Furnishings 

L. HIRSH 

250 HUNTINGTON AVE., BOSTON 

OPPOSITE SYMPHONY HALL 


I OWN 

1 AVE RN 

WINCHENDON, MASS. 

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Tel. Back Bay 3722-R Res. Tel., 3081 -J Dorchester 

A. JACOBS 

Exclusive Ladies' Tailor 

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TELEPHONE 2053-R BACK BAY 

KALISH & SON 

French Tailoring Co. 

Ladies' Tailors 

AND 

Habit Makers 

Remodelling, Cleaning, Dyeing and 
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i 1 

60 WESTLAND AVENUE 

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ANT) THINGS "PHOTOGRAPHIC 

EVERYTHING for the AMATEUR 

M || Bring your films and plates to 
^1 us to be properly developed 
ill and printed. 

Hubbell & McGowan 

Ube iReliable Druggists 

Opposite Symphony Hall 



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Gban&ler & Co. 

Impartrrs anDi iEftatlrrs 

arrmmtt &tml - Near fflrst 6tmi - Boston 

^ £aiiW ©utftttrra 

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SCHOOL PINS 

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Designer and Maker of 

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OUR RATES ARE AS FOLLOWS :— 

Single room, with bath . $3.00, $3.50 and $4.00 
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J. C. LA VIN, Manager 

FRED STERRY, Managing Director 

CHAMPLAIN & FARRAR 

Special JXates to Conscrfaatorp ^>tubents! 
161 TREMONT STREET BOSTON 

TELEPHONE 



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PIANOS 

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ESTABLISHED 1863 
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Cfje Hementoap Hotel 

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The Nearest First Class Hotel to the Conservatory of Music and 
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L. H. TORREY, Manager 



€mers>on College of 
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HENRY LAWRENCE SOUTHWICK 
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The largest school of Oratory. Literature. 
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m Ittcrjftelb g>tubto 

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• 

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TELEPHONE ARL. 307 



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State Street Trust Company 

BRANCH OFFICE 

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STATE STREET TRUST COMPANY 

MAIN OFFICE - 33 STATE STREET 

BRANCH OFFICE - 130 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 
SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS OF MOST MODERN CONSTRUCTION AT BOTH OFFICES 



Athenia Corsets 

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12-14 Winter Street 

422 Boylston Street 
Boston - - - - - Mass. 



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149 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 



. . . THE . . . 

BERLITZ SCHOOL 
OF LANGUAGES 

132 BOYLSTON STREET 

Telephone, Oxford 23958 

Branches in over oUO leading cities in America, 
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Terms reasonable Catalogue on application 

GRAND PRIZES AT ALL RECENT 
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TRIAL LESSON EREE 
New Classes Constantly Forming 

SCHOOL OPEN ALL SUMMER 



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Telephone 5946 B. B. 

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Srtnttg Jlnnat 

Designer Decorator 

543 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Women are depending more than ever before on good figures 
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for the up-to-date girl we would be sure to mention KABO Model, 
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Other models $1 .50 to $3.00. For sale by 



L. HIRSCH, 

Opposite Symphony Hall 



250 HUNTINGTON 
AVENUE 



Telephone 253 1 -R Back Bay 



Established 1879 



LANDERS' 
%unt\) anb Coffee ^ouse 

327 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 
16a -20 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 
196 DARTMOUTH STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 

A. G. LANDERS, Manager 




- - 



ENGRAVED CARDS 



■STEEL 6 C0PPEP P//TES 
30 BROMFIELO ST. ROST0N 



m&l James Cafe 

241-243 HUNTINGTON AVE. 

(Near Mass. Ave.) 

FRENCH j4ND A2£E%lCAtNL CUISINE 

& IBacfe Map Cafe 

MCOTUST UNIQUE HOJKCELIKE 

JKCusic Evenings and Sunday Afternoons 
Huuler's Chocolates and 3°" fBons 
GEO. B. ASIN1AC 

Contferbatorp #rarjuatts 

wishing to secure lucrative employ- 
ment in the leading educational in- 
stitutions should connect themselves 
with the 

i£o£ton jHusitcal anb 
Cbucattonal pureau 

2 1 8 TREMONT ST., BOSTON 

This bureau is now in its fifteenth 
year of successful operation and is 
managed by 

HARRY C. LAHEE 

Formerly Secretary of the 5\£eir England Conservator}: 
of JOCusic. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



O. H. BRYANT 

MAKER OF 

HIGH GRADE VIOLINS 
VIOLAS, CELLOS and BOWS 

Expert Copyist of Famous Cremonas. Maker 
of the perfected Amber Oil Varnish in all the 
desirable colors. Violin makers' supplies, 
wood, tools, patterns, varnish, etc. Founder 
of the Boston School of Violin Making. Old 
violins bought, sold and exchanged. 

250 HUNTINGTON AVENUE - BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone, 5254 Back Bay 



REINHARDT'S 

BACK BAY 

BAKERY 



DELICATESSEN A SPECIALTY 



252 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 

(Opposite Boston Storage Warehouse) 
TEL., BACK BAY 21830 



& Wovh from tfje printer 

May 8, 19 13. 

Mr. Guv S. Maier, 
Class 1913, 

n. e. conservator v of music. 

Dear Sir: 

It gives us pleasure to enter your order for printing "The Neume" 
for the class of 1913. The work will he pushed with all haste as re- 
quested. 

To those of the students who are not familiar with our work we 
desire to say that we print here a good many well known publications 
and books for particular people, and that a portion of our plant is in 
operation day and night for the convenience of those who want quick 
service. YYe hold ourselves in constant readiness to print a book or a 
booklet, a pamphlet or a program. 

Yours very truly, 

E. L. Grimes Co.. 

By E. L. Grimes, Tr. 

122 Pearl Street, Boston. 



F-0-CLAR.K 
RNGRAVING 
COMPANY 

PHOTO ENGRAVERS 

B O \S T O N-MAnSnS' 

TELL 1S3 • • O XJTOR,D 
FRANK O. CLARK. MANAGER